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The Magus

By John Fowles

(16)

| Paperback | 9780099743910

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Book Description

A novel which explores the complexities of the human mind. On a remote Greek island, Nicholas Urfe finds himself embroiled in the deceptions of a master trickster. Surreal threads weave ever tighter as reality and illusion intertwine in a bizarre psy Continue

A novel which explores the complexities of the human mind. On a remote Greek island, Nicholas Urfe finds himself embroiled in the deceptions of a master trickster. Surreal threads weave ever tighter as reality and illusion intertwine in a bizarre psychological game.

9 Reviews

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  • 1 person finds this helpful

    Your sense of reality will be totally lost, the 'truth' changes with every page, and you never know what will happen next - and though you expect a total uprooting of everything that has gone on until then, you are always surprised by the actual turn ...(continue)

    Your sense of reality will be totally lost, the 'truth' changes with every page, and you never know what will happen next - and though you expect a total uprooting of everything that has gone on until then, you are always surprised by the actual turn of events. Possibly a bit slow at times, it is still a book I definitely recommend.

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    Cristina said on Mar 4, 2014 | Add your feedback

  • 3 people find this helpful

    smoke and mirrors, endless brain games, twisted minds: when you start to get a firm grasp on a character, it crumbles in front of you like a house of cards. mesmerising reading, it keeps you hanging on.

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    Elsastella said on Mar 8, 2011 | Add your feedback

  • 1 person finds this helpful

    Un romanzo sempre pieno di colpi di scena e risvolti inaspettati, un'indagine nella mente e nei comportamenti umani. Quando Nicholas Urfe, il protagonista, pensa finalmente di aver capito il mondo di Conchis, che tiene i fili dei "burattini" che mano ...(continue)

    Un romanzo sempre pieno di colpi di scena e risvolti inaspettati, un'indagine nella mente e nei comportamenti umani. Quando Nicholas Urfe, il protagonista, pensa finalmente di aver capito il mondo di Conchis, che tiene i fili dei "burattini" che manovra, puntualmente viene smentito. Teatro, magia, psicologia, storia, realtà e invenzione: c'è tutto questo e molto altro in questo libro sorprendente.

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    Manu said on Jul 19, 2010 | Add your feedback

  • 1 person finds this helpful

    “Baron von Masoch sat on a pin / Then sat again, to push it in”.

    This will take a while.
    *adopts Nicholas Urfe conceited manners*
    I approached this book and found myself feeling like young Urfe does in the story itself. I read spoilers. I knew that the basic idea was later stolen to make a Hollywood blockbuster ...(continue)

    This will take a while.
    *adopts Nicholas Urfe conceited manners*
    I approached this book and found myself feeling like young Urfe does in the story itself. I read spoilers. I knew that the basic idea was later stolen to make a Hollywood blockbuster you have probably seen (and I read, with sadness, that Fowles considered a legal case but decided against it because going against Hollywood lawyers was quixotic for an old British writer).

    I even downloaded and watched the 1968 movie, a remarkably shite effort by very good actors (Anthony Quinn re-doing Zorba the Greek, a very young and curiously expressionless Michael Caine in a dead monotone like he can’t wait to have another sex scene or go for another swim on glorious Greek beaches instead of talking philosophical bollocks) – it must be said that the movie did capture the visual atmosphere of the story though, I wouldn’t have imagined the island of Phraxos in any other way, the exaggerated Mediterranean light which “does not purify, but corrodes”. I also knew from Fowles’ previous books that he is prone to tricky plots and, well, mindfucks (try “The French Lieutenant’s Woman”, where the narrator’s point of view and the historical perspective bounce back and forth like tennis balls).

    So I approached the book like Urfe approaches the strange Greek billionaire on the island: thinking I could second-guess anything that would happen.

    The hubris!

    And the beauty of it is how young, pretentious, self-centered Urfe, plunged into a world where reason and reality basically stop, still thinks he’s above it, still wants to tag events with normal names, still tries to reduce the huge spins on the real world to plausible reasons; our human instinct to resize everything to bite-size human dimensions will always make us limited. How laughably proud he feels every time he thinks he has solved a riddle or found a realistic solution to things! Then comes another mad spin on reality, and there he tries to make “human” sense of it again.

    Urfe is a despicable anti-hero, a smarmy 25-year-old who feels he's on top, a liar, a cheater who thinks nothing of hurting people, and totally deserves everything that happens to him; you want to see what next amazing/horrible/punishing/ravishing thing happens to him to see if he learns any lessons, but he doesn’t. The reader, who might not be such vermin, feels a certain pleasure in his pain, but also feels a very real and upsetting vertigo caused by being *constantly lied to*. Fowles lies to you all the time. Every time you think the “magician” Conchis is perhaps telling something real, and you cling to it because it’s simply unbearable – at a very primitive, personal level - to be faced with a character who never says anything that can be proven or trusted, he’ll pull the rug from under you with some even madder story, or embellishment, or maybe a flat-out lie disguised as a rational utterance. The feeling of outrage and lack of certainties is nearly physical.
    There are myriads of references to occultism, mythologies, symbolisms which I recognize, but am too ignorant on these subjects to understand what they actually mean. It’s frustrating: I just barely grasp that the book can be read at a higher level, but the dozen or so references I do get make me painfully aware of the two hundred references I do not. I felt like I was watching a movie on a black and white Sixties TV, knowing it’s playing in glorious 3D megascreen in a multiplex I’m not allowed in. Experts of occultism and/or myths will probably take a lot more pleasure in this book. It will remain enigmatic to me at that level, unless someone publishes an annotated version, which probably won’t happen because this book is being slowly forgotten.
    There are also philosophical questions - and few answers.

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    Paola said on Apr 6, 2010 | Add your feedback

  • 1 person finds this helpful

    除了那座島很吸引人,劇情一開始就無趣,人物更無趣,看了幾章還是欲振乏力,我想大概也不會看下去了……結果Fowles自己在序裡做的評價是對的,為什麼這本書可以賣得很不錯??

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    GreenFire said on Jul 26, 2009 | Add your feedback

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