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A Plea for Eros

Essays

By

Publisher: Picador USA

4.0
(3)

Language:English | Number of Pages: 228 | Format: Paperback

Isbn-10: 0312425538 | Isbn-13: 9780312425531 | Publish date:  | Edition 1

Also available as: Others , eBook

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Book Description
From the author of the international bestseller What I Loved, a provocative collection of autobiographical and critical essays about writing and writers Whether her subject is growing up in Minnesota, cross-dressing, or the novel, Hustvedts nonfiction, like her fiction, defies easy categorization, elegantly combining intellect, emotion, wit, and passion. With a light touch and consummate clarity, she undresses the cultural prejudices that veil both literature and life and explores the multiple personalities that inevitably inhabit a writers mind. Is it possible for a woman in the twentieth century to endorse the corset, and at the same time approach with authority what it is like to be a man? Hustvedt does. Writing with rigorous honesty about her own divided self, and how this has shaped her as a writer, she also approaches the works of othersFitzgerald, Dickens, and Henry Jameswith revelatory insight, and a practitioners understanding of their art.
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    - Hustvedt's essays are very
    writerly, usually exploring issues of identity or literary concepts. Her thought-provoking writings are at once intellectual and sentimental
    - the piece "Gatsby's G;asses" is a charming review on the Great Gatsby
    - "Of course women are sexual objects ...continue

    - Hustvedt's essays are very
    writerly, usually exploring issues of identity or literary concepts. Her thought-provoking writings are at once intellectual and sentimental
    - the piece "Gatsby's G;asses" is a charming review on the Great Gatsby
    - "Of course women are sexual objects; so are men," she writes, sensibly, and issues a "plea that we not forget ambiguity and mystery, that in matters of the heart we acknowledge an abiding uncertainty."
    -But she cloaks her vulnerability in mock humility. She makes coy assertions ("when I finally produced a poem I liked, I sent it to The Paris Review; and to my astonishment, the poem was accepted and published") and waxes auto-hagiographic ("I held fiercely to the lonely idea of my great destiny"). Even her lousy junior high experience is a sign that her woundedness has rendered her special.

    said on