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Blood's A Rover

By James Ellroy

(19)

| Paperback | 9780099537793

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Book Description

The final novel in the magisterial Underworld USA Trilogy.

It’s 1968. Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King are dead. The Mob, Howard Hughes and J Edgar Hoover are in a struggle for America’s soul, drawing into their murderous conspiracies the dammed Continue

The final novel in the magisterial Underworld USA Trilogy.

It’s 1968. Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King are dead. The Mob, Howard Hughes and J Edgar Hoover are in a struggle for America’s soul, drawing into their murderous conspiracies the dammed and the soon-to-be damned. Wayne Tedrow Jr.: parricide, assassin, dope cooker, mouthpiece for all sides, loyal to none. His journey will take him away from the darkness and into an even greater darkness. Dwight Holly: Hoover’s enforcer and hellish conspirator in terrible crimes. As Hoover’s power wanes his destiny lurches towards Richard Nixon and self-annihilation Don Crutchfield: is a kid, a nobody, a wheelman and a private detective who stumbles upon an ungodly conspiracy from which he and the country may never recover. All three men are drawn to women on the opposite side of the political and moral spectrum; all are compromised and ripe for destruction. Only one of them will survive. The final part of James Ellroy’s Underworld USA trilogy is set during the social and political upheaval of 1968-72. Blood’s a Rover is an incandescent fusion of fact and fiction and is James Ellroy’s greatest masterpiece.

2 Reviews

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  • 1 person finds this helpful

    Started reading Blood's A Rover immediately after finishing The Cold Six Thousand, and nearly 7 years after American Tabloid.

    Despite not having JFK, Bobby Kennedy or Martin Luther King's assassination to anchor the novel, Blood A Rover manages to ...(continue)

    Started reading Blood's A Rover immediately after finishing The Cold Six Thousand, and nearly 7 years after American Tabloid.

    Despite not having JFK, Bobby Kennedy or Martin Luther King's assassination to anchor the novel, Blood A Rover manages to have a stronger narrative drive than The Cold Six Thousand. I think this is because the novel begins with an armed robbery, and readers are curious about this crime and the connection to the key characters. The Cold Six Thousand lacked such a narrative device and thus felt less driven.

    Blood's A Rover also contains the strongest female characters I've read in Ellroy's novels (LA Quartest and the Underworld Trilogy). Sure, these female characters are quite macho, but this still offers some change in the novel.

    In terms of language and style, Ellroy has tamed back the hyper elliptical style in The Cold Six Thousand for slightly more "mainstream" sentences in Blood's A Rover. Ellroy's short bursts of sentences never bothered me, but I know a few friends who've had issues with it. The police / agent jargon is still present but slightly more manageable if you've gotten this far in the series.

    A fitting climax to an outstanding trilogy. Very readable and thrilling.

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    Jubei said on Apr 5, 2010 | Add your feedback

  • 1 person finds this helpful

    the trilogy ends with a book that resembles (and repeats) The cold 6k: the style is the same, the characters are always 6-feet-3 and muscular, the ellroy jargon is in place and everything runs smooth and tough right til the end.</p><p>unf ...(continue)

    the trilogy ends with a book that resembles (and repeats) The cold 6k: the style is the same, the characters are always 6-feet-3 and muscular, the ellroy jargon is in place and everything runs smooth and tough right til the end.</p><p>unfortunately, Blood's a rover reads like the 2nd part of 6k, not like a new original novel in itself (like its two predecessors) and the impression is that ellroy could have done a much better job of it all if he only had focused less on slang and fantapolitics, and more on the individual perspective of the many (and interesting) protagonists.</p><p>the last parts (V and VI) of the novel are the best: the pace somehow slackens and the meaning finally emerges.

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    crus said on Oct 31, 2009 | Add your feedback

Book Details

  • Rating:
    (19)
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  • English Books
  • Paperback 656 Pages
  • ISBN-10: 0099537796
  • ISBN-13: 9780099537793
  • Publisher: Windmill Books
  • Publish date: 2010-06-03
  • Also available as: Hardcover , Softcover , eBook
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