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Franny and Zooey

By

Publisher: Back Bay Books

4.1
(1500)

Language:English | Number of Pages: 208 | Format: Paperback | In other languages: (other languages) Japanese , German , French , Italian , Spanish , Catalan , Dutch , Czech

Isbn-10: 0316769029 | Isbn-13: 9780316769020 | Publish date: 

Also available as: School & Library Binding , Hardcover , Softcover and Stapled , Others

Category: Family, Sex & Relationships , Fiction & Literature , Religion & Spirituality

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Book Description
The author writes: Franny came out in The New Yorker
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  • 4

    Salinger in vena religiosa

    Salinger riesce sempre a farmela in maniera incredibile! Dietro il suo stile così poco attraente nasconde sempre perle di rara bellezza. Come questa: non avrei mai immaginato l'autore del giovane Hold ...continue

    Salinger riesce sempre a farmela in maniera incredibile! Dietro il suo stile così poco attraente nasconde sempre perle di rara bellezza. Come questa: non avrei mai immaginato l'autore del giovane Holden in vena religiosa come qui. A distanza di anni (ne sono passati un bel po' da quando lessi il giovane Holden), la magia con la quale Salinger riesce a catturarti si riconferma.

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  • 5

    Gemma della letteratura americana, Franny e Zooey é un piccolo capolavoro che condensa, in poche pagine, le peculiarità portanti della poetica di Salinger. Lo stile impeccabile attraverso cui l'autore ...continue

    Gemma della letteratura americana, Franny e Zooey é un piccolo capolavoro che condensa, in poche pagine, le peculiarità portanti della poetica di Salinger. Lo stile impeccabile attraverso cui l'autore da sfoggio delle sue paralizzanti abilità d'uso della lingua e il tratteggio di personaggi dalla psicologia estremamente complessa, sono forse i due elementi cardine attorno ai quali ruota l'intero nucleo narrativo del romanzo. Attraverso due racconti lunghi che si insinuano nella psiche dei più giovani componenti della famiglia Glass, l'autore ci propone un enigma, ci confonde le idee, ci fa intravedere la risposta, la soluzione, la rivelazione e ad un soffio da questa ci abbandona nella nebbia del'incertezza. Abbiamo tutte le premesse per accedere all'illuminazione, la scorgiamo da lontano ma l'insicurezza ci blocca, il non detto ci inibisce.
    Franny e Zooey ci sono riusciti. Noi ce la faremo?

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    4

    This novel is pervaded by a spiritual and mystic atmosphere, even if it is written in a different way from the doctrinal one.
    Salinger writes poetry without using rhymes.
    The novel was published in 19 ...continue

    This novel is pervaded by a spiritual and mystic atmosphere, even if it is written in a different way from the doctrinal one.
    Salinger writes poetry without using rhymes.
    The novel was published in 1961: Less and Bessie Glass, international and music artists, have seven children, the two youngest are Franny and Zooey, the main characters of the novel.
    It happened Zooey had made a formal and serious debut as a public performer at the age of seven. He was the second youngest of what had originally been seven brothers and sisters—five boys and two girls—all of whom, at rather conveniently spaced intervals during childhood, had been heard regularly on a network radio program, a children's quiz show called"It's a Wise Child.", that was considered unique in commercial radio and that lasted just over sixteen years: from 1927 well into 1943.
    Seymour had his Ph.D. at an age when most young Americans are just getting out of high school. At the age of six, Seymour, the eldest and the cleverest, but also the most problematic son, could read the great writers of literature, he could speak some classic and modern languages and he was learning some others.
    He was starting his religious path following the Eastern mysticism.
    Seymour and his brother Buddy, the second child, were a sort of spiritual guide for the rest of the family and when Seymour killed himself in 1948, his death represented a frightening wound never sutured for them.
    Above all for his sister Franny, a girl of twenty years old who, apart from his complicated relationship with her boyfriend Lane, lives a mystic crisis.
    Her crisis is caused by the reading of a book called 'The Way of a Pilgrim' written by a Russian peasant.
    The pilgrim wants to find out what it means in the Bible when it says you should pray incessantly.
    So he starts out walking all over Russia.
    He meets a person called a starets—some sort of terribly advanced religious person— who tells him about the Jesus Prayer first of all. 'Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me.'. And he explains to him that those are the best words to use when you pray. Especially the word 'mercy,' because it's such a really enormous word and can mean so many things.
    This reading deeply involved Franny who starts her silent prayer in her family home, far from the college she attends.
    At her home, she feels Seymour's presence and her mystic anxiety increases till the point she refuses food.
    She is sick of not having the courage to be an absolute nobody, all she knows is she's losing her mind. She is sick of ego, ego, ego.
    She is just her own and everybody else's.
    She is sick of everybody that wants to get somewhere, do something distinguished and all, be somebody interesting.
    She doesn't care what anybody says
    That's why she quits the Theatre Department. Just because she is so horribly conditioned to accept everybody else's values, and just because she likes applause and people to rave about her, doesn't make it right. She is ashamed of it. She is sick of it. She is afraid to compete—that's what scares her.
    She tells all her feelings to his brother Zooey, who tries to help her to desist.
    He explains that if she is going to say the Jesus Prayer, she has to keep Him in mind and Him only, and Him as He was and not as she'd like Him to have been. She doesn't face any facts. This same damned attitude of not facing facts is what got her into that messy state of mind in the first place, and it can't possibly get her out of it.
    Jesus is the only the most intelligent man in the Bible, Zooey says.
    When she doesn't see Jesus for exactly what He was, she misses the whole point of the Jesus Prayer. If she doesn't understand Jesus, she can't understand His prayer—she doesn't get the prayer at all, she just get some kind of organized cant. Jesus was a supreme adept, by God, on a terribly important mission. And when she misses seeing that, she is missing the whole point of the Jesus Prayer. The Jesus Prayer has one aim, and one aim only. To endow the person who says it with Christ-Consciousness.
    And moreover, she forgets one thing: when she first felt the urge, the call, to say the prayer, she didn't immediately start searching the four corners of the world for a master. She came home.
    Even if she went out and searched the whole world for a master —some guru, some holy man—to tell her how to say your Jesus Prayer properly, what good would it do her?
    She can say the Jesus Prayer from now till doomsday, but if she doesn't realize that the only thing that counts in the religious life is detachment. Detachment and only detachment. Cessation from all hankerings.
    The only religious thing she can do, is act. Act for God, if she wants to— be God's actress, if she wants to.
    Zooey remembers about the fifth time he ever went on 'Wise Child.' Seymour'd told him to shine my shoes just as he was going out the door with Waker. He was furious. The studio audience were all morons, the announcer was a moron, the sponsors were morons, and he just damn well wasn't going to shine his shoes for them, he told Seymour. He said to shine them anyway. He said to shine them for the Fat Lady. I didn't know what the hell he was talking about, but he had a very Seymour look on his face, and so he did it. He never did tell him who the Fat Lady was, but he shined his shoes for the Fat Lady every time he ever went on the air again.
    This terribly clear, clear picture of the Fat Lady formed in his mind.
    It seemed god dam clear why Seymour wanted him to shine my shoes when he went on the air. It made sense.
    Franny said Seymour told her, too; he told her to be funny for the Fat Lady, once.
    But Zooey reveals her a terrible secret: there isn't anyone out there who isn't Seymour's Fat Lady.
    And then he asks Franny: don't you know who that Fat Lady really is? ... It's Christ Himself.
    She appeared to find it extraordinarily beautiful to listen to, she seemed to know, too, when to stop listening to it, as if all of what little or much wisdom there is in the world were suddenly hers. She got into the bed. For some minutes, before she fell into a deep, dreamless sleep, she just lay quiet, smiling at the ceiling.

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  • 3

    Salinger ha l'incredibile (e a tratti fastidiosa) capacità di lasciarti avvicinare ad una Risposta, di fartela quasi toccare e poi di portartela via di colpo, abbandonandoti lì confuso e con la vaga s ...continue

    Salinger ha l'incredibile (e a tratti fastidiosa) capacità di lasciarti avvicinare ad una Risposta, di fartela quasi toccare e poi di portartela via di colpo, abbandonandoti lì confuso e con la vaga sensazione che un po' sia colpa tua, per il semplice motivo di non essere nato nella famiglia Glass.
    I tre dialoghi che caratterizzano la struttura dei racconti sono avvincenti, appassionanti e meravigliosamente inconcludenti: sì, vogliono dire qualcosa di importante, e sì, te la devi vedere tu per capire cosa perché l'autore non ha nessuna intenzione di aiutarti.
    Un esempio chiaro è il dialogo tra Franny e Zooey, a mio parere non il più riuscito (questa medaglia spetta a quello tra Zooey e Bessie) ma il più denso di significato: sei lì lì per capire, per afferrare, per illuminarti, ma poi Zooey si sdraia sul pavimento e quella scintilla svanisce, e spetta a te, lettore, a lettura finita, ritrovarla.

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  • 3

    Perché poi, diciamocelo, non è che il tutto sia davvero comprensibile: le conversazioni, i riferimenti, i modi di fare e i piccoli segreti dei protagonisti di Franny and Zooey sono riassumibili in “fa ...continue

    Perché poi, diciamocelo, non è che il tutto sia davvero comprensibile: le conversazioni, i riferimenti, i modi di fare e i piccoli segreti dei protagonisti di Franny and Zooey sono riassumibili in “fastidiosi” comportamenti che lasciano il lettore vagamente perso nel nulla, come quando dai un calcio a un sassolino e questo cade in un burrone e tu dall’alto lo guardi e cerchi di capire dove sia finito pensando comunque che tra tutte quelle foglie cadute al suolo sarà impossibile ritrovarlo.

    http://justanotherpoint.wordpress.com/2014/09/16/leggendo-67-il-matrimonio-tra-me-e-salinger-non-sha-da-fare/

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  • 2

    Libro che si sviluppa in tre lunghi dialoghi, è probabilmente l'opera meno riuscita di Salinger. Apprezzo il tema spirituale (e le ultime due pagine, semplici ma preziose), ma l'ho trovato noioso e ve ...continue

    Libro che si sviluppa in tre lunghi dialoghi, è probabilmente l'opera meno riuscita di Salinger. Apprezzo il tema spirituale (e le ultime due pagine, semplici ma preziose), ma l'ho trovato noioso e verboso. "Il Giovane Holden" è un capolavoro (specialmente per la carica innovatrice) ma Salinger temo sia un autore decisamente sopravvalutato.

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