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Lolita

A Screenplay

By

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

4.1
(93)

Language:English | Number of Pages: 240 | Format: eBook | In other languages: (other languages) Italian

Isbn-10: 0307787605 | Isbn-13: 9780307787606 | Publish date: 

Also available as: Paperback , Hardcover

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Book Description
The screenplay for Kubrik's 1962 film tells the story of an older man's obsession with a young girl
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    Humbert Humbert loves little girls, the so-called nymphets, those girls who seduce adults through their behavior through their true nature, that is not human, but demoniac.
    In fact the book was succ ...continue

    Humbert Humbert loves little girls, the so-called nymphets, those girls who seduce adults through their behavior through their true nature, that is not human, but demoniac.
    In fact the book was successful because for the first time it has delineated he figure of nymphet.
    When Humbert Humbert meets Lolita, a lovely nymphet of twelve years, he immediately falls in love with her.
    She seduces him since the first moment he sees her and after her mother’s death, he starts a long travel through America with the girl.
    From this instant, Humbert Humbert lives an important love story during which loves her madly: he adores her, he watches her spasmodically, while Lolita thinks to other things.
    Lolita is a pungent,lovable, smart and naïve girl, but also one of the most female enigmatic character of the literature.
    When someone else takes Lolita away from Humbert Humbert, he cannot stand it and he wants to revenge this bad action.
    He is clearly a pedophile, even if he has a great respect for the common girls, for their purity and their vulnerability and in absolutely no case, he would have attacked the innocence of a girl, if there would have been the risk of a scandal.
    He knows he loves Lolita more than anything he has ever seen or imagined on earth, he loves that pale and contaminated girl, who is pregnant of another man.
    That grey eyed girl , with her sooty eyebrows.
    He does not think he has deprived Lolita of her innocence and of her childhood, because according to him the moral sense is considered by mortal people the price to pay to the sense of beauty.
    He decides to ignore the fact that for her, he was not a lover, or a charming man, or a big friend, and not even a person.
    He says he is a monster, but he loves her and he does not consider himself a criminal sexual psychopath taking indecent liberties with a child.
    And what is most singular is that she, this Lolita, his Lolita, has individualized the writer’s ancient lust, so that above and over everything there is Lolita.
    What drives him insane is the twofold nature of this nymphet of every nymphet, perhaps; this mixture in her Lolita of tender dreamy childishness and a kind of eerie vulgarity, stemming from the snub-nosed cuteness of
    ads and magazine pictures, from the blurry pinkness of adolescent maidservants in the Old Country (smelling of crushed daisies and sweat); and from very young harlots disguised as children in provincial brothels; and then again, all this gets mixed up with the exquisite stainless tenderness seeping through the musk and the mud, through the dirt and the death.

    said on