Create your own shelf sign up

Together we find better books

[−]
  • Search Conteggio caratteri ISBN valido ISBN non valido Codice a barre valido Codice a barre non valido loading search

Look to Windward

By

Publisher: ORBIT (LITT)

4.3
(97)

Language:English | Number of Pages: 416 | Format: Paperback | In other languages: (other languages) Italian

Isbn-10: 184149061X | Isbn-13: 9781841490618 | Publish date: 

Also available as: Hardcover , Softcover and Stapled , eBook , Others

Category: Mystery & Thrillers , Non-fiction , Science Fiction & Fantasy

Do you like Look to Windward ?
Join aNobii to see if your friends read it, and discover similar books!

Sign up for free
Book Description

The Twin Novae battle had been one of the last of the Idiran war, and one of the most horrific: desperate to avert their inevitable defeat, the Idirans had induced not one but two suns to explode, snuffing out worlds and biospheres teeming with sentient life. They were attacks of incredible proportion -- gigadeathcrimes. But the war ended, and life went on.

Now, eight hundred years later, light from the first explosion is about to reach the Masaq' Orbital, home to the Culture's most adventurous and decadent souls. There it will fall upon Masaq's 50 billion inhabitants, gathered to commemorate the deaths of the innocent and to reflect, if only for a moment, on what some call the Culture's own complicity in the terrible event.

Also journeying to Masaq' is Major Quilan, an emissary from the war-ravaged world of Chel. In the aftermath of the conflict that split his world apart, most believe he has come to Masaq' to bring home Chel's most brilliant star and self-exiled dissident, the honored Composer Ziller.

Ziller claims he will do anything to avoid a meeting with Major Quilan, who he suspects has come to murder him. But the Major's true assignment will have far greater consequences than the death of a mere political dissident, as part of a conspiracy more ambitious than even he can know -- a mission his superiors have buried so deeply in his mind that even he cannot remember it.

Hailed by SFX magazine as "an excellent hopping-on point if you've never read a Banks SF novel before," Look to Windward is an awe-inspiring immersion into the wildly original, vividly realized civilization that Banks calls the Culture.

Sorting by
  • 4

    my first experience with Iain M. Banks

    i was very curious to read something by Banks, and i'm satisfied with this first book.
    i'm not completely sold on his universe, and i think that sometimes he wastes too much time in description or episodes that could be shorter and still effective.

    surely i'll read more by this autho ...continue

    i was very curious to read something by Banks, and i'm satisfied with this first book.
    i'm not completely sold on his universe, and i think that sometimes he wastes too much time in description or episodes that could be shorter and still effective.

    surely i'll read more by this author, but let me list what i have troubles with.

    like some critic was writing about Banks' universe, the minds are 'too good'. i wonder why, after years, thousands of years of good minds, there are still humans around. they don't work, they don't need to, so usually this leads to decadence and either collapse/extintion or return to barbarism. the minds of course won't let either one happen, but why? they don't need men, and they'll probably be better off without.

    the whole mind premise is based on cheap and endless energy. i don't know how this agrees with real physics. it is surely interesting to develop a story where energy is not a problem, nor it is dirty or hard to get. and it is interesting to see how, even without troubles with energy, man can find other way to get in trouble anyway. but is it sound?

    let me give you 2 examples. in 'return from universe' stanislaw lem imagines a world without too many problems. people live without worry, and they seem to be in a state of frozen development. they don't need the stars, and they don't care.
    they completely renounced their most dramatic human emotions, and live in a pampered world. no dangers, no pains.
    here the compromise is evident and yet energy is not free, or endless.

    in 'r.u.r.' karel capec imagines biological robots, conceived to save labour from humans. the main reason is greed, and the inevitable mistake will soon appear. again, an almost endless resource of energy is clearly not cheap and not without its problems.

    neither capec nor lem imagined the development of information technology that is contained in banks' book, but banks seem to try to get past these past examples and projects his stories forward, in an unbelievable universe that seems closer to p.j. farmer 'makers of universes' than to hard core science fiction.

    another thing is the 'star trek' fauna that inhabits the worlds. leaving aside drones and minds, the different creatures seem to come straight from an episode of star trek rather than from a 1990s science fiction masterpiece.

    maybe i need to read more, but the descriptions i read so far of an orbital don't convince me so much, as jack vance's descriptions in 'the daemon princes'. that is still my measuring meter for planets and worlds.

    nonetheless, the story has lots of surprises and i want to read more.

    said on 

  • 4

    Iain M. Banks torna prepotentemente a stuzzicare la mia fantasia ed a stimolare il mio interesse. Non tutti i lavori sulla Cultura (gli unici che ho letto di questo autore) mi erano piaciuti, specie gli ultimi. Con questo, ultimo tradotto in italiano, si chiude il cerchio tanto più che come aveva ...continue

    Iain M. Banks torna prepotentemente a stuzzicare la mia fantasia ed a stimolare il mio interesse. Non tutti i lavori sulla Cultura (gli unici che ho letto di questo autore) mi erano piaciuti, specie gli ultimi. Con questo, ultimo tradotto in italiano, si chiude il cerchio tanto più che come aveva iniziato con Pensa a Fleba qui finisce ricollegandosi direttamente al primo capitolo dando vita ad un vero e proprio sequel. Sebbene le riflessioni sulla responsibilità di una società tanto immensa (non solo in numeri) come quella della Cultura siano presenti anche nelle opere precedenti, mai come qui si evidenziano i conflitti interiori che possono esserci. L'utopia creata è ben lungi dall'essere perfetta, è anzi colma di contraddizioni, vizi, errori: da grandi poteri (praticamente divini) derivano grandi responsabilità. Nei confronti di tutti. Sia che si agisca (come ed in che modo) sia che si stia fermi a guardare (come ed in che modo). Le sfumature sono molteplici e l'universo descritto da Banks è tanto vario da risultare incredibile. Con superbia cerca di superare alcuni canoni e non si perita nella descrizioni di sistemi e forme di vita al limite del concepibile. Se vuole sottolineare le immense ed infinite diversità che esistono tra essere senzienti, riesce a creare anche u po' di confusione nel lettore che si trova a fare i conti con descrizioni sì dettagliate, ma che non hanno un corrispettivo da visualizzare. La trama in sé è ingegnosa quasi da spy story, riesce a sorprendere e si fa seguire con attenzione.

    said on 

  • 4

    Bel libro di fantascienza, descrizioni di mondi immensi , tecnologici e fantastici il tutto arricchito da una storia mystery, peccato che altri libri del ciclo della cultura sono pressoché introvabili...

    said on 

  • *** This comment contains spoilers! ***

    4

    Not your typical "big bang" Banks ending

    I think I got used to much to the way Ian Banks ends his stories, they always end in the least expected way, with a huge surprise that he's been building up to since the first page. This book is no different, but I'd be lying if I said I didn't expect more. It did got me thinking though: is the e ...continue

    I think I got used to much to the way Ian Banks ends his stories, they always end in the least expected way, with a huge surprise that he's been building up to since the first page. This book is no different, but I'd be lying if I said I didn't expect more. It did got me thinking though: is the end all that matters? No, its not all that matters, its important but THAT important. The story till the very end was exciting and intriguing, and with the right amount of imagination the environment can be quite breathtaking.

    said on 

  • 5

    Divertente e fantasioso come ogni libro di fs dovrebbe essere. In alcuni punti il libro mi ha ricordato le surreali, ironiche e gustose atmosfere di Jeff Hawke, ed è per questo motivo che gli ho tributato una stellina in più.

    said on 

  • 5

    Un tuffo nella Cultura

    "Volgi lo sguardo al vento ci conferma che Banks è l'unità di misura di tutta la fantascienza contemporanea." The Guardian</p><p>È con queste parole che, dalla quarta di copertina, il libro si presenta al lettore, e, sinceramente, penso che il Guardian non abbia del tutto torto. Certo ...continue

    "Volgi lo sguardo al vento ci conferma che Banks è l'unità di misura di tutta la fantascienza contemporanea." The Guardian</p><p>È con queste parole che, dalla quarta di copertina, il libro si presenta al lettore, e, sinceramente, penso che il Guardian non abbia del tutto torto. Certo, il "fenomeno Banks" forse non è più così forte e innovativo come poteva sembrare fino a qualche anno fa, in pieni anni 90', ma da un punto di vista prettamente letterario penso che Banks possa essere considerato a tutti gli effetti un vero e proprio classico moderno del genere. Le sue invenzioni narrative, anche se forse ormai surclassate da quelle di autori più alla moda (uno su tutti Charles Stross), sono e rimangono trovate eccezionali, vere e proprie pietre di paragone per l'intero genere fantascientifico, e il suo stile letterario diverte, strabilia e commuove allo stesso tempo. È un mix di successo che ha conquistato moltissimi lettori e che sembra destinato a perdurare. (A febbraio 2008 è uscito Matter, il suo ultimo libro ambientato nello stesse universo di questo libro) Ma veniamo al dunque:</p><p>Volgi lo sguardo al vento è stato il primo libro con cui mi sono avvicinato al fantastico mondo della Cultura di Iain M. Banks. La Cultura, per chi non lo sapesse, è un'avanzatissima civiltà interstellare costituita da umani, robot, cyborg, sofisticatissime intelligenze artificiali (Menti) e alieni disseminata per gran parte della galassia. Una società utopica, liberale ed edonistica che si da il caso non sia in grado di resistere alla tentazione di ficcare il naso negli affari altrui.<br />In questo libro, seguito ideale di Pensa a Fleba (che purtroppo non ho ancora letto), un gruppo di alieni Chelgriani trama nell'ombra per vendicare i miliardi di propri simili morti in una guerra civile scoppiata su Chel a causa di una delle proverbiali interferenze della Cultura. Protagonisti della vicenda sono uno strambo gruppo di esponenti della Cultura, tra cui un rinnegato Chelgriano, e Quilan, colui che dovrebbe portare a termine l'attentato terroristico ai danni di un Orbitale (un gigantesco mondo artificiale a forma di anello) della Cultura.<br />Banks riesce ad imbastire una storia avvincente e ricca di colpi di scena assolutamente logica e interessante senza penalizzare il lettore poco avvezzo alle storie della Cultura. Questo libro è in effetti leggibile come un'opera del tutto autonoma, comprensibile dunque anche a chi non ha mai letto Pensa a Fleba o qualunque altro libro del Ciclo. Le descrizioni di ambienti e personaggi sono qualcosa di assolutamente formidabile. In alcune pagine è davvero facile poter cogliere un senso di meraviglia e di poesia, così come in altre invece prevale il sarcasmo. Alcuni battibecchi tra i cittadini della Cultura sono assolutamente esilaranti, quasi dallo scompisciarsi dalle risate.<br />Il tutto all'interno di un quadro più generale popolato da astronavi gigantesche (dai nomi assurdi) e intelligenze artificiali dalle capacità sconfinate, mondi di gas popolati da creature antichissime e civiltà sublimate da millenni. Un universo esagerato in cui tutto è smisurato e sconvolgente e in cui tutto, o quasi, è possibile.<br />I personaggi sono delineati in maniera assolutamente impeccabile. Dal Chelgriano rassegnato che ha perso la voglia di vivere in seguito alla morte della compagna, al robottino petulante e fastidioso ma con un forte senso del dovere, passando per il saccente ma cordiale Mozzo dell'Orbitale fino al Chelgriano rinnegato entrato forse un po' troppo nell'ottica dello stile di vita della Cultura.<br />Sicuramente un libro consigliato.

    said on 

  • 4

    La saga della Cultura è una dei più riusciti affreschi del genere fantascientifico contemporaneo, forse il solo al livello di Hyperion di Simmons (senza voler dimenticare McMaster Bujold e Brin). Quet’ultimo Volgi lo sguardo al vento ha confermato l’enorme fascino dell’universo narrativo creato d ...continue

    La saga della Cultura è una dei più riusciti affreschi del genere fantascientifico contemporaneo, forse il solo al livello di Hyperion di Simmons (senza voler dimenticare McMaster Bujold e Brin). Quet’ultimo Volgi lo sguardo al vento ha confermato l’enorme fascino dell’universo narrativo creato da Banks, incentrato su una avanzatissima società utopica, la Cultura, e sul suo confronto con civiltà meno evolute. Malgrado la tematica centrale sia sempre la stessa (in questo caso vista in negativo: la politica di interferenza della Cultura ha causato una guerra disastrosa, che ora scatena una vendetta potenzialmente altrettanto catastrofica), Banks sa offrire nuovamente un intreccio coinvolgente, pieno di spunti (in particolare, l’idea che, una volta riusciti in vari modi a superare la morte – le “copie di sicurezza” della propria mente, il paradiso creato dai Sublimati, trascesi ad una diversa forma di esistenza – l’immortalità potrebbe non essere poi così desiderabile: più di un personaggio alla fine preferirà l’oblio definitivo), dei personaggi interessanti (alieni di specie diverse, intelligenze artificiali...), una ambientazione visionaria (l’orbitale Masaq, un mondo perfetto abitato da cinquanta miliardi di individui; le immense aerosfere abitate da esseri grandi come interi mondi e come tali popolati da innumerevoli specie).

    said on