Pet Sematary

By

Publisher: New English Library Ltd

4.0
(4803)

Language: English | Number of Pages: 480 | Format: Paperback | In other languages: (other languages) Spanish , Italian , French , German , Chi traditional , Dutch , Swedish , Portuguese , Latvian , Slovenian , Chi simplified , Greek , Catalan , Polish , Czech , Russian , Hungarian

Isbn-10: 0450057690 | Isbn-13: 9780450057694 | Publish date: 

Also available as: Mass Market Paperback , Audio CD , Hardcover , Audio Cassette , Library Binding , eBook

Category: Fiction & Literature , Horror , Mystery & Thrillers

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Book Description

AN ADAPTION BY BBC RADIO BASED ON STEPHEN KING'S PET SEMATARY A Fully-Dramatized Multi-Voice Presentation

Dr. Louis Creed and his wife Rachel chose rural Maine to settle his family and bring up their children. It was a better place than smog-covered Chicago -- or so he thought. But that was before he became acquainted with the old pet burial ground located in the backwoods of the quiet community of Ludlow.

The place has a power -- it seeps into your dreams and you wake up sweating with fear. It is a place that strikes dread into the lives of all who share its secrets.

A fully dramatized BBC presentatin of one of Stephen King's most famous bestsellers, PET SEMATARY is a masterpiece of the macabre and an unforgettable audio experience!

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  • 2

    La storia potrebbe essere veramente accattivante, come nel classico stile King, ma si dilunga troppo e molti passaggimancano di sostanziali motivazioni: da leggere a saltelloni per sapere come fa a fi ...continue

    La storia potrebbe essere veramente accattivante, come nel classico stile King, ma si dilunga troppo e molti passaggimancano di sostanziali motivazioni: da leggere a saltelloni per sapere come fa a finire....

    said on 

  • 4

    (內文有雷)
    說實在的,沒有很喜歡Stephen King的書,因為書友的推薦,就趁著暑假一讀。《寵物墳場》結合古墳場的故事,所以不免令人感到有些怪力亂神,許多人都是將閱讀重點放在人們對於身旁生命(寵物、親人等)的執著與不捨,進而動心起念,不擇手段想要留住逝者的生命。然而,違反自然的規則是要付出代價的,死而復生的生命變得乖戾可怖,言下頗有順天應命的涵義。閱畢,感受父母深愛子女的驅力,結局所帶來的悵 ...continue

    (內文有雷)
    說實在的,沒有很喜歡Stephen King的書,因為書友的推薦,就趁著暑假一讀。《寵物墳場》結合古墳場的故事,所以不免令人感到有些怪力亂神,許多人都是將閱讀重點放在人們對於身旁生命(寵物、親人等)的執著與不捨,進而動心起念,不擇手段想要留住逝者的生命。然而,違反自然的規則是要付出代價的,死而復生的生命變得乖戾可怖,言下頗有順天應命的涵義。閱畢,感受父母深愛子女的驅力,結局所帶來的悵然之感猶存!

    said on 

  • 5

    Bellissimo. Anche questa volta King è stato in grado di trattare un tema particolare. Come in Carrie le tematiche del bullismo e fanastismo sono affrontate senza cadere nel buonismo, in questo romanzo ...continue

    Bellissimo. Anche questa volta King è stato in grado di trattare un tema particolare. Come in Carrie le tematiche del bullismo e fanastismo sono affrontate senza cadere nel buonismo, in questo romanzo il tema della morte è analizzato da vari punti di vista e nelle sue varie sfaccettature. Non solo la morte in sè, ma anche gli effetti che provoca la perdita di una persona cara, il modo di affrontarla, il confine vita/morte...
    Un romanzo dal ritmo un po' lento, ma secondo me perfetto così poiché senza fretta è in grado di presentarci i personaggi, le relazioni, i luoghi e permetterci di affezionarci a loro.

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  • 5

    Pet Sematary
    by

    Stephen King

    Another masterpiece of the King, another jewel by Stephen King.
    It is not only a novel about Pet Samatary and its secret, but there is much more.
    Here we know the joy to ...continue

    Pet Sematary
    by

    Stephen King

    Another masterpiece of the King, another jewel by Stephen King.
    It is not only a novel about Pet Samatary and its secret, but there is much more.
    Here we know the joy to have a new house in Ludlow. This the joy of Louis Creed a middle aged doctor, and his family.
    Rachel was his wife; she was still not entirely sure about this move to Maine from Chicago, where she had lived her whole life.
    Eileen and Gage were their children.
    When Eileen arrived in Ludlow was six years, Gage was two.
    Winston Churchill moved in with them. Church was Eileen’s cat.
    Louis Creed had lost his father at three and has never known a grandfather, never expected to find a father as he entered his middle age, but that is exactly what happened . . . although he called that man a friend.
    He met this man on the evening he and his wife and his two children moved into the big white frame house in Ludlow.
    This man was Jud Crandall.
    “My dad built that house across the way. Brought his wife there, and she was taken with child there, and that child was me, born in the very year 1900." Jud Crandall explained.
    "Got married to my Norma, put in my time on the railroad, and here we still are. But I’ve seen a lot of life right here in Ludlow. I sure have.”
    Norma Crandall, a sweetly pleasant woman who had rheumatoid arthritis which kills so much of what could be good in the old ages of men and women who are otherwise healthy— but her attitude was good. She would not surrender to the pain; there would be no white flags.
    Behind their house there was a path; Jud told them about this path leading to Pet Samatary.
    "I buried my dog Spot up there when I
    was ten. He was chasing a rabbit, and he run on some rusty barbed wire. The wounds infected and it killed him.” He said.
    But there was something wrong about that, something that doesn't fit with something Louis has been previously told.
    Jud had told him that his dog had died when he was ten—had died of infection after being scraped up in a snarl of rusty barbed wire
    But on the late-summer day when all of them had walked up to the Pet Sematary together, Jud said that his dog had died of old age and was buried there—he had even pointed out the marker, although the years had worn the inscription away.
    Something else was wrong.
    Jud had been born with the century, and that day at the Pet Sematary he had told Louis his
    dog had died during the first year of the Great War. That would have been when Jud was fourteen, if he had.
    But then he had said that Spot died when he, Jud, was ten. Well, he’s an old man, and old men get confused in their memories, he thought uneasily.
    When Ellie comes back from Pet Sematary,
    we faced the horror: her horror had been articulated; it was out; she wept because of the human being’s wonderful, deadly ability to translate symbols into conclusions that were either fine and noble or blackly terrifying.
    Those animals had died and been buried, then Church could die (any time!) and be- buried; and if that could happen to Church, it could happen to her mother, her father, her baby brother. To herself. Death was a vague idea; the Pet Sematary was real.
    “I don’t want Church to be like all those dead pets!” she burst out, suddenly tearful and furious. “I don’t want Church to ever be dead! He’s my cat! He’s not God’s cat! Let God have His own cat! Let God have all the damn old cats He wants, and kill them all! Church is mine!”
    She says.
    It would be easy for Louis to lie at this point, but a lie would be remembered later and perhaps finally totted up on the report card all children hand in to themselves on their parents.
    “Honey,” he said, “it happens. It’s a part of life.”
    “It’s a bad part!” she cried. “It’s a really bad part!”
    “There’s nothing wrong with a child finding out something about death, Rachel! Louis said to his wife. It’s perfectly natural. “
    Because, as a doctor, he knew that death
    was, except perhaps for childbirth, the most natural thing in the world.
    But Rachel considered that place, the Pet Samatary a damned place.
    “Do you think it’s just a pet cemetery to her? It’s going to leave a scar, Lou. ! “
    At this point of the novel the thought of the death becomes preponderant: that death was a secret, a terror, and it was to be kept from the children.
    And moreover we assist to a superb dialogue between father and daughter about life after the death and about the meaning of faith.
    Ellie was the daughter of a woman who was a non practicing Jew and a man who was a lapsed Methodist, and he supposed her ideas about the whole spiritus mundi were of the vaguest
    sort—not myths, not dreams, but dreams of dreams.
    “People believe all sorts of things about what
    happens to us when we die,” he said. “Some people think we go to heaven or hell. Some people believe we’re born again as little children—” it’s reincarnation, but I guess you’ve got the idea. The Catholics believe in heaven and hell, but they also believe there’s a place called limbo and one called purgatory. And the Hindus and Buddhists believe in
    Nirvana"
    "Do you know what faith is? Faith is believing a thing will be, or is. Faith is a great thing.
    What we know is this: When we die, one of two things happens. Either our souls and thoughts somehow survive the experience of dying or they don’t. If they do, that opens up every possibility you could think of. If we don’t, it’s just blotto. The end.” Louis explained to Ellie.
    For most of his adult life—since college days, he supposed—he had believed that death was the end.
    “I believe that we go on,” but as to what it’s like, I have no opinion. It may be that
    it’s different for different people. It may be that you get what you believed all your life. But I believe we go on. ”
    “Do you think animals go on?”
    “Yes,” he said, without thinking, and for a moment he almost added, Especially cats. The words had actually trembled on his lips for a moment, and his skin felt gray and cold.
    Gray and cold like Rachel's sister, Zelda.
    "When I was a kid, I thought of it a lot. Lost
    a lot of sleep. Dreamed of monsters coming to eat me up in my bed, and all of the monsters looked like my sister Zelda.” Rachel told her husband.
    Zelda died. . . spinal meningitis. . .
    There were no pictures of her in the house anymore.
    “There’s a picture of a young girl in your father’s—” Louis said.
    She was two years older than Rachel was. She caught it and she was in the back bedroom like a dirty secret, she was dying in there, her sister died in the back bedroom and that’s what she was, a dirty secret—she was always a dirty secret!
    They watched her degenerate day by day, and there was nothing anyone could do. She was in constant pain. When the pain got bad enough, they started giving her drugs.
    But of course everyone knew she wasn’t going to live.
    Rachel had started to think Zelda hated her because her back was straight, because she didn’t have the constant pain, because she could walk, because she was going to live . . . she started to imagine she wanted to kill her . She thought she hated her.
    Zelda was starting to look like a monster, and she was starting to be a monster.
    Victims of long illnesses often become demanding, unpleasant monsters. The
    idea of the saint like, long-suffering patient is a big romantic fiction.
    When she died, Rachel's parents were gone and she was alone with Zelda. She was only eight and it was a tragedy not only for their parents but above all fir Rachel.
    She has lost her sister and she had known the horror of the death.
    It’s probably wrong to believe there can be any limit to the horror which the human mind can experience. On the contrary, it seems that some exponential effect begins to obtain as deeper and deeper darkness falls—as little as one may like to admit it, human experience tends, in a good many ways, to support the idea that when the nightmare grows black enough, horror spawns horror, one coincidental evil begets other, often more deliberate evils, until finally blackness seems to cover everything. And the most terrifying question of all may be just how much horror the human mind can stand and still maintain a wakeful, staring, unrelenting sanity.
    Louis Creed might have harbored such thoughts if he had been thinking rationally following the funeral of his son, Gage William Creed, on the seventeenth of May.

    When Jesus came to Bethany, he found that Lazarus had lain in the grave four days already. When Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she hurried to meet him.
    “Lord,” she said, “if you had been here, my brother would not have died. But now you are here, and I know that whatever you ask of God, God will grant.”
    Jesus answered her: “Your brother shall rise again.”

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  • 3

    l'avevo iniziato vquando avevo circa 16 anni, lasciato a meta' ,lo scorso anno l'ho ricominciato a leggera dall'inizio e l'ho finito. Nulla di eccezionale, bello nel genere. Lo consiglio.

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  • 4

    Un romanzo horror coi fiocchi. La prima metà è di introduzione ai personaggi, al loro aspetto caratteriale ed emotivo e getta le basi per quello che sarà la restante metà dell'opera. I ritmi sono più ...continue

    Un romanzo horror coi fiocchi. La prima metà è di introduzione ai personaggi, al loro aspetto caratteriale ed emotivo e getta le basi per quello che sarà la restante metà dell'opera. I ritmi sono più lenti, a volte ci si dilunga anche un po' troppo su aspetti non essenziali.
    La seconda metà è Stephen King allo stato puro, tragedia e horror mescolate in modo eccezionale. Finale perfetto.

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  • 5

    Al terzo posto tra i migliori di King...per il momento

    Un libro molto ben scritto, uno dei migliori di King a mio avviso dopo La zona morta e Il miglio verde. Immaginavo si svolgesse diversamente nel momento culminante, un po' come nel film. Ad ogni modo ...continue

    Un libro molto ben scritto, uno dei migliori di King a mio avviso dopo La zona morta e Il miglio verde. Immaginavo si svolgesse diversamente nel momento culminante, un po' come nel film. Ad ogni modo mi è piaciuto, si legge tutto d'un fiato e ci sono interessanti riflessioni sulla morte e descrizioni accurate sulle emozioni dei personaggi.

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  • 4

    Dicono i tuttologi di King, e King stesso conferma, che questo è probabilmente il romanzo più macabro e inquietante dello scrittore. Sottoscrivo.

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  • 5

    IL MIGLIORE DI KING LETTO AL MOMENTO

    Quando leggi questo libro hai dei sospetti e credi che ti porti in una determinata direzione invece King ti spiazza e ti porta da tutt'altra parte lasciandoti col fiato sospeso. Mi è piaciuta molto la ...continue

    Quando leggi questo libro hai dei sospetti e credi che ti porti in una determinata direzione invece King ti spiazza e ti porta da tutt'altra parte lasciandoti col fiato sospeso. Mi è piaciuta molto la tematica della morte , il fatto che l'uomo non si rassegni e cerchi in tutti i modi di esorcizzare questa cosa , arriva ad essere anche qualcosa di cui non si deve parlare . Ho trovato molto interessante anche l'aspetto della razionalità e dell'irrazionalità : il protagonista fa il medico e da una parte è abituato ad avere a che fare con la morte ma quando poi le cose ci succedono in primis , allora non abbiamo la razionalità se ne va per dare spazio all'irrazionalità che spesso ci porta a fare cose di cui non saremmo capaci .
    Il finale è sconvolgente ed è un finale aperto ..quando ho letto le ultime pagine ho avuto un brivido gelido che mi ha attraversato la schiena . Rendetevi conto
    uno dei migliori King letti al momento

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