Shanghai Baby

Average vote of 836
| 6 total contributions of which 6 reviews , 0 quotes , 0 images , 0 notes , 0 video

The gap that divides those of us born in the 1970s and the older generation has never been so wide.

Dark and edgy, deliciously naughty, an intoxicating cocktail of sex and the search for love, Shanghai Baby has already risen to cult st

The gap that divides those of us born in the 1970s and the older generation has never been so wide.

Dark and edgy, deliciously naughty, an intoxicating cocktail of sex and the search for love, Shanghai Baby has already risen to cult status in mainland China. The risque contents of the breakthrough novel by hip new author Wei Hui have so alarmed Beijing authorities that thousands of copies have been confiscated and burned. As explicit as Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer, as shocking as Trainspotting, this story of a beautiful writer and her erotically charged affairs jumps, howls, and hits the ground running as it depicts the new generation rising in the East.

Set in the centuries-old port city of Shanghai, the novel follows the days, and nights, of the irrepressibly carnal Coco, who waits tables in a café when she meets her first lover, a sensitive Chinese artist. Defying her parents, Coco moves in with her boyfriend and enters a frenzied, orgasmic world of drugs and hedonism. But, helpless to stop her gentle lover's descent into addiction, Coco becomes attracted to a boisterous Westerner, a rich German businessman with a penchant for S/M and seduction. Now, with an entourage of friends ranging from a streetwise madame to a rebellious filmmaker, Coco's forays into in the territory of love and lust cross the borders between two cultures -- awakening her guilt and fears of discovery, yet stimulating her emerging sexual self. Searing a blistering image into the reader's imagination, Shanghai Baby provides an alternative travelogue into the back streets of a city and the hard-core escapades of today's liberated youth. Wei Hui's provocative portrayal of men, women, and cultural transition is an astonishing and brave exposure of the unacknowledged new China, breaking through official rhetoric to show the inroads of the West and a people determined to burst free. ...Continua

Ha scritto il 08/06/14
trash
Storia squallida e superficiale di un branco di viziati/tossici. Protagonista estremamente arrogante e altezzosa: "io sono bella", "io sono sexy"... Qualcosa mi dice che l'autrice sia esattamente come la sua creaturina protagonista. Deludente.
  • 3 mi piace
  • 1 commento
Ha scritto il 19/01/12
I give it two stars rather than one because although I read it with disdain, I was still compelled to read it. For all its literary pretension (every chapter beings with a quotation to prove how well read the author is), it`s still a trashy novel. An ...Continua
Ha scritto il 04/11/08
SPOILER ALERT
what a shameless self-portrait of the rotten life style of the author
Degrading women to the extent that should piss all feminists off! Or I should say degrading all Shanghai women, by describing sex with Caucasian men a fashion.
  • 2 mi piace
Ha scritto il 25/09/07
I know a lot of people loved this book. Even those that I lent it to. But, in all honesty, it struck me as pretentious, especially when making references to pop (sub)culture. I don't know why. But maybe I'll give it another try.
  • 1 mi piace
Ha scritto il 01/09/07
This might have been the wrong book to read simultaneously with Smedley's. After pages and pages of life and death struggle the rather spoilt life of a modern girl living in Shanghai seemed terribly superficial. There were just so many references to
  • 1 commento

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