Create your own shelf sign up

Together we find better books

[−]
  • Search Conteggio caratteri ISBN valido ISBN non valido Codice a barre valido Codice a barre non valido loading search

So Much for That

By

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

3.7
(30)

Language:English | Number of Pages: 464 | Format: eBook | In other languages: (other languages) Italian

Isbn-13: 9780007351886 | Publish date: 

Also available as: Others , Hardcover , Paperback , Softcover and Stapled

Category: Fiction & Literature

Do you like So Much for That ?
Join aNobii to see if your friends read it, and discover similar books!

Sign up for free
Book Description

An extraordinary novel from the Orange Prize winning author of ‘We Need to Talk About Kevin’.

What do you pack for the rest of your life?

Shepherd Knacker is bored with his humdrum existence. He's sold his successful handy-man business for a million dollars and is now ready to embark on his 'Afterlife' - a one way ticket to a small island off the coast of Africa. He tries to convince his wife Glynis to come with him, but she laughs off the idea as preposterous.There's no way she'll let Shepherd uproot the family to some far-flung African island.

When Glynis is diagnosed with an extremely rare and aggressive form of cancer, Shepherd's dreams of an exotic adventure are firmly put on hold. He devotes himself to caring for his sick wife, watching her fade before his eyes.

Shepherd's best friend Jackson knows all too well about illness. His sixteen year old daughter has spent her life dosed up on every treatment going while he and his wife Carol feed their youngest daughter sugar pills so she won't feel left out. But then Jackson undergoes a medical procedure of his own which has devastating consequences …

So Much For That is a deeply affecting novel, told with Lionel Shriver's trademark originality, intelligence and acute perception of the human condition.

Sorting by
  • *** This comment contains spoilers! ***

    3

    I prefer Zanzibar

    This novel is about Shep, who dreams of getting away from it all, of cutting his losses from a life of work and wealth acquisition to spend what he calls “the afterlife” in a suitably exotic location. He has spent many years trying to convince his wife, Glynis, to have the same dream, but without ...continue

    This novel is about Shep, who dreams of getting away from it all, of cutting his losses from a life of work and wealth acquisition to spend what he calls “the afterlife” in a suitably exotic location. He has spent many years trying to convince his wife, Glynis, to have the same dream, but without success so far. Very early on in the book, Shep decides that it’s finally time to live his dream, he’s going to Pemba, with or without Glynis. At this point, she announces that she has been diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and the central theme of the book becomes apparent: the cost of medical care. The novel is set in the USA, the protagonists are wealthy people.

    (Spoilers coming thick and fast now:)

    Clinical procedures and treatments are followed to buy Glynis time and rapidly deplete the family’s resources. To make matters worse, Shep loses his job, and therefore medical insurance for his family, and there are still many other calls on his purse: looking after Gabe, his aging father, supporting an impossibly bitchy sister, providing for his and Glynis’s two children.

    The other characters in the novel are Shep’s friends: nice Carol married to angry Jackson, with their two daughters, Heather and Flicka, the latter a very smart cookie and heavily disabled. There is also a suitably evil boss. The hero Shep is an improbably all-round nice guy, taking care of everybody beyond the call of duty, saintly in his ministrations to his sick wife and a handy man (every woman’s dream, surely, forget the six-pack) with a penchant for artistic tinkering (he creates wacky fountains).

    And this is a note to the person who lent me this book: when I said I wanted to retire to Zanzibar (Pemba is an island in the Zanzibar archipelago), I wasn’t thinking particularly of dying there! Anyway, when Glynis is close to death, Shep decides to move her to Pemba, together with his father, his son (the daughter who is no longer in education stays in the US), Carol and her two daughters (mad at the world Jackson having in the meantime shot himself). They get there. All the sick and aged die in rapid succession: Glynis, Gabe and Flicka and the survivors stay on Pemba, blissfully happy.

    I enjoyed parts of this book: Jackson’s rants are fun to read and references to bao and cloves brought happy memories back. A review said that “British readers will close this excellent novel feeling grateful for the NHS”. Indeed, but France is ranked first for “overall health system performance” in 191 countries in the WHO’s latest report (2000) on the topic. OK, it does mean our social contributions are a leeetle bit on the high side.

    said on 

  • 4

    Non raggiunge la quasi perfezione di "Dobbiamo parlare di Kevin" però ci si avvicina. Un po' troppo verbosa in certe parti dove analizza finemente la situazione dell'assicurazione sanitaria americana, mi sa che tale situazione come minimo le procura una bella incazzatura cosmica. E poi il finale ...continue

    Non raggiunge la quasi perfezione di "Dobbiamo parlare di Kevin" però ci si avvicina. Un po' troppo verbosa in certe parti dove analizza finemente la situazione dell'assicurazione sanitaria americana, mi sa che tale situazione come minimo le procura una bella incazzatura cosmica. E poi il finale é un po' troppo mieloso, l'ho trovato strano per una come la Shriver che pare scrivere con un rasoio.
    Lo definerei "tagliente" questo libro, in alcune sue parti bisogna fare attenzione alle pagine che sono affilate come coltelli per il sushi, la loro lettura può causare ferite, grandi i piccole, proprio come far passare un dito sulla lama del succitato coltello.

    said on 

  • 4

    So much for that

    Adoro lo stile cinico e distaccato della Shriver, anche se devo ammettere che tra i suoi libri questo è quello che mi è piaciuto meno (gli ho comunque assegnato 4 stelline, ma gli altri due libri sono per me due capolavori). Il libro è un’aspra critica contro le assicurazioni sanitarie americane, ...continue

    Adoro lo stile cinico e distaccato della Shriver, anche se devo ammettere che tra i suoi libri questo è quello che mi è piaciuto meno (gli ho comunque assegnato 4 stelline, ma gli altri due libri sono per me due capolavori). Il libro è un’aspra critica contro le assicurazioni sanitarie americane, che di fatto non permettono ad una persona seriamente malata di curarsi. La lettura mi ha ricordato moltissimo “Sicko”, il film di Moore che tratta lo stesso argomento. In “Tutta un’altra vita” si racconta principalmente di due malati: Glynis, artista cinquantenne a cui viene diagnosticato un terribile e raro tumore e Flicka, sedicenne affetta da una malattia genetica quasi sconosciuta. Entrambe lotteranno a modo loro, cercheranno di vivere la loro malattia grazie all’aiuto dei loro familiari (senza un lavoro non si ha diritto all’assicurazione) ed entrambe lo faranno con una buona dose di cinismo. La malattia qui, non è uno stato che va compatito, sembra piuttosto necessario compatire chi sta loro vicino. Infatti Shep, marito di Glynis, dovrà rinunciare al progetto su cui aveva sognato per tutta la vita, mentre Carol e Jackson, genitori di Flicka, affronteranno non poche avversità. Rimane sullo sfondo, ma non per questo è sminuito, il dolore delle due malate, un dolore che potrebbe capitare a chiunque. Fin qui il libro è splendido. La parte finale, però, non mi ha pienamente convinta, mi è sembrata semplicistica e frettolosa. E’ un libro da leggere, un libro che pone molti interrogativi sul diritto di essere curati.

    said on 

  • 3

    Dopo aver letto "Dobbiamo parlare di Kevin" , "Effetti sconvolgenti di un compleanno" questo libro mi è sembrato assolutamente noioso! L'ho abbandonato a un quarto. Dov'è finita la Lionel Shriver dei primi due libri?

    said on 

  • 5

    The best book I've read in ages. The characters are so real you feel you will meet them when you walk out of the front door. It has everything - humour, tragedy, realism and fantasy. If you are American, I feel so sorry for you if you get ill; if you are British you will think "thank God for t ...continue

    The best book I've read in ages. The characters are so real you feel you will meet them when you walk out of the front door. It has everything - humour, tragedy, realism and fantasy. If you are American, I feel so sorry for you if you get ill; if you are British you will think "thank God for the NHS".

    said on 

  • 4

    Non era il testo più adatto da leggere per me, in questo preciso momento. Troppe implicazioni personali, troppa vicinanza con la mia storia e mi sono sentita più di una volta in difficoltà, incespicando fra le righe che mi addoloravano e mi ferivano. La cosa che più mi ha impressionato è il “trad ...continue

    Non era il testo più adatto da leggere per me, in questo preciso momento. Troppe implicazioni personali, troppa vicinanza con la mia storia e mi sono sentita più di una volta in difficoltà, incespicando fra le righe che mi addoloravano e mi ferivano. La cosa che più mi ha impressionato è il “tradimento dello Stato Sociale” del Liberismo Americano. Obama, allargando la platea degli aventi diritti alla Salute Pubblica, ha curato un aspetto incredibile del gran Paese delle Possibilità: i veramente poveri muoiono in spazi pubblci, definiti ospedali, che non offrono le cure necessarie. Le assicurazioni di copertura sanitaria sono necessarie per poter ottenere l’assistenza necessaria, ma, nei casi di prognosi difficile ed infausta, si rivelano avvoltoi senza pietà. Numerosi films e testi hanno raccontato come è facile, negli USA, perdere casa, lavoro famiglia, perché un familiare si ammala gravemente. Ogni capitolo del testo della Shiver si apre con il saldo del conto Merrill Lynch del protagonista. Quanta fatica per conciliare bisogni, sogni e necessità contingenti. Quanta fatica per non farsi tirare la giacchetta a destra e sinistra, senza perdere il proprio punto di vista, la propria integrità, per non passare dalla parte dei Fessi a quella dei Furbi. Ringrazio il Cielo di essere Italiana (nonostante tutto). Poi, le ultime pagine, l’illuminante deduzione: la vita è una, la famiglia è importante, bisogna credere in sé stessi e fare del Bene perché la ns. natura ce lo chiede, seguire le proprie propensioni e godere del Bello e del Buono. Vorrei che tutto fosse così semplice, ma la Paura del Dolore (quello fisico e non), la Paura della Solitudine, l’Incomprensione, il lato oscuro del genere umano che non è poi tanto affascinante, sono lì nell’ombra della mia vita, come avviene per altre esistenze come la mia. Testo interessante, da stomaci resistenti.

    said on 

  • 3

    Non posso dire che il libro sia brutto però... troppa malattia, troppa angoscia. La malattia purtroppo lo sappiamo, fa parte della vita. Però...ho fatto molta fatica.
    Un libro sugli orrori del Sistema Sanitario Americano: viva il nostro sistema sanitario nazionale, direi, anche con le sue i ...continue

    Non posso dire che il libro sia brutto però... troppa malattia, troppa angoscia. La malattia purtroppo lo sappiamo, fa parte della vita. Però...ho fatto molta fatica.
    Un libro sugli orrori del Sistema Sanitario Americano: viva il nostro sistema sanitario nazionale, direi, anche con le sue imperfezioni ed i suoi meccanismi lenti e talvolta perversi.

    said on 

  • 3

    It was alright. Maybe would have meant more to an American reader rather than British. A lot of illness, but some fine dark humour

    said on 

  • 3

    just too depressing book 2

    Lionel Shriver has a way with words - her works are dense and intense and you live the situation with the protagonist. I adored We need to talk about Kevin and the Post Birthday World (even though partially about the world of snooker). Here we are in the world of: everything goes wrong and life s ...continue

    Lionel Shriver has a way with words - her works are dense and intense and you live the situation with the protagonist. I adored We need to talk about Kevin and the Post Birthday World (even though partially about the world of snooker). Here we are in the world of: everything goes wrong and life stinks... Shepard, who always had one goal: leave the rat race as we know it and go live elsewhere - after years of saving, planning and visitng africa, asia and belgium(?) (france was excluded as too socialist(,)), etc he is ready to go, with or without his wife and son. And then murphy's law - he announces his imminent departure to his wife, who listens and then informs him she has cancer. And then it is bleek bleek bleek. Everything goes from bad to worse. Relentlessly...

    said on 

Sorting by