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Sophocles, Volume II. Antigone. The Women of Trachis. Philoctetes. Oedipus at Colonus

(Loeb Classical Library No. 21)

By Hugh Lloyd-Jones,Sophocles

(5)

| Hardcover | 9780674995581

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Book Description

Sophocles (497/6-406 BC), with Aeschylus and Euripides, was one of the three great tragic poets of Athens, and is considered one of the world's greatest poets. The subjects of his plays were drawn from mythology and legend. Each play contains Continue

Sophocles (497/6-406 BC), with Aeschylus and Euripides, was one of the three great tragic poets of Athens, and is considered one of the world's greatest poets. The subjects of his plays were drawn from mythology and legend. Each play contains at least one heroic figure, a character whose strength, courage, or intelligence exceeds the human norm—but who also has more than ordinary pride and selfassurance. These qualities combine to lead to a tragic end.

Hugh Lloyd-Jones gives us, in two volumes, a new translation of the seven surviving plays. Volume I contains Oedipus Tyrannus (which tells the famous Oedipus story), Ajax (a heroic tragedy of wounded self-esteem), and Electra (the story of siblings who seek revenge on their mother and her lover for killing their father). Volume II contains Oedipus at Colonus (the climax of the fallen hero's life), Antigone (a conflict between public authority and an individual woman's conscience), The Women of Trachis (a fatal attempt by Heracles' wife to regain her husband's love), and Philoctetes (Odysseus' intrigue to bring an unwilling hero to the Trojan War).

Of his other plays, only fragments remain; but from these much can be learned about Sophocles' language and dramatic art. The major fragments—ranging in length from two lines to a very substantial portion of the satyr play The Searchers—are collected in Volume III of this edition. In prefatory notes Lloyd-Jones provides frameworks for the fragments of known plays.

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    Having read a few Greek plays now I must say I prefer Euripedes to Sophocles. I read this story as we were going to see a modern adaptation and I wanted to know the story before we went. Reading it I wasn't sure how they'd be able to adopt it to the ...(continue)

    Having read a few Greek plays now I must say I prefer Euripedes to Sophocles. I read this story as we were going to see a modern adaptation and I wanted to know the story before we went. Reading it I wasn't sure how they'd be able to adopt it to the modern day as the entire point of the story seemed to be you shouldn't piss off the gods but give them their due or you will be horribly punished. There were however some really great lines mostly by Creon. But I must admit that sadly the story didn't inspire me enough to go and read the rest of the plays in this edition.

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    Robot-mel said on Jul 24, 2012 | Add your feedback

Book Details

  • Rating:
    (5)
    • 4 stars
  • English Books
  • Hardcover 608 Pages
  • ISBN-10: 0674995589
  • ISBN-13: 9780674995581
  • Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publish date: 1994-01-01
  • Dimensions: 193 mm x 774 mm x 1,096 mm
  • Also available as: Paperback
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