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Surprised by Joy

By

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

4.3
(24)

Language:English | Number of Pages: 288 | Format: Paperback

Isbn-10: 0006280838 | Isbn-13: 9780006280835 | Publish date:  | Edition New Ed

Also available as: Hardcover , Audio CD , Others , Audio Cassette , eBook

Category: Biography , Religion & Spirituality

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Book Description
In this book Lewis tells of his search for joy, a spiritual journey that led him from the Christianity of his early youth into atheism and then back to Christianity. This book, together with his early diary All My Road Before Me, form the closest thing we have to an autobiography.
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  • 5

    Can we too, be partakers of joy?

    {taken directly from my blog. please pardon the informal writing.}


    ok so I finished Surprised by Joy. it’s spectacular. this being C.S. Lewis’ pseudo-biography, it wasn’t an intensive couse in hard theology*, though the trunk of his book is about his journey into salvation. it’s really per ...continue

    {taken directly from my blog. please pardon the informal writing.}

    ok so I finished Surprised by Joy. it’s spectacular. this being C.S. Lewis’ pseudo-biography, it wasn’t an intensive couse in hard theology*, though the trunk of his book is about his journey into salvation. it’s really personal, so there’s room for countless branches and offshoots—a share of his candid observations about life. a literary diamond mine. many of his reflections were so true it left me reeling.

    I can infer what C.S Lewis meant in each paragraph or even in a singular recollective instant, but truth is, I can’t piece paragraph X in relation to chapter Y or example Z. but I know they’re related, somehow. it’s like playing connect-the-dots, but failing to find the image behind it. vague links, haphazard lines, but no clear idea. countless (seemingly unrelated) inklings that lead to the same answer. can the solution be drawn so easily? I have questions but I haven’t been able to come up with answers.

    if you’re willing to discuss this with me, or have any sort of answer or opinion to my questions, it would be greatly appreciated. I don’t usually tag my posts, but i’m quite anxious for any external input. thanks in advance.

    what I don’t understand:

    - why haven’t I ever experienced this joy before? am I too coarse or dull? can Lewis’ experiences of joy be experienced by others? that is, can we too, be partakers of joy? - I know one person that acutely understands why Lewis means when he writes “joy”, but unlike him, she was already a Christian; it wasn’t fleeting and she recognized that joy as heavenly. is this joy different from C.S. Lewis’ painful longing, or one and the same? - as an adolescent, what aspect of mythology did Lewis find so appealing that provided him with that “joy” that he sought so hard to relive? - how could an unsaved Lewis chance upon this joy? is it pocketed in remote corners or planted (so to speak) in random places, for people to pick up? are they intended clues for the scavenger to find? - did his epiphanic moments of joy come from mundane events in his day-to-day life (ie., washing dishes), or from the reveling in the beauty of nature (being struck by walking the countryside), or from allowed glimpses into the supernatural? (I suppose this is relegated to mere speculation at best.) it seems so infuriatingly random, and that frustrates me. - does intellect opens one’s eyes to the spiritual, the beautiful, the sensual better than others? - what distinguishes joy from pleasure? is joy, like Lewis wrote, merely desire in disguise? - how can one be so sure that joy is just a shadow of desire, that desire being something that cannot possibly be obtained in this world? - how he found the “missing” link between the God in Christianity and joy, when popular knowledge suggested otherwise (or is this again divine providence?) I’ve read (and to some extent understand) his ditching of theories and progression into Christianity, but the “final leap” seems so great. or is that what faith is all about?

    * only the final chapters truly focus on logical and theological extrapolation. written to the point leading up to his ultimate conversion, his Christian life is briefly brushed upon, but not elaborated.

    said on 

  • 4

    Lewis spends most of the book writing of his early days - upbringing, university, army, university again. In all the book covers 32 years of his life - interesting, exciting, and absorbing days! He was a bright lad and from very early childhood displayed literary talent - at least, the literary w ...continue

    Lewis spends most of the book writing of his early days - upbringing, university, army, university again. In all the book covers 32 years of his life - interesting, exciting, and absorbing days! He was a bright lad and from very early childhood displayed literary talent - at least, the literary world engaged his mind - the talent was to be released at a later date. A great book!

    said on