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The Collector

By

Publisher: Vintage

4.3
(67)

Language:English | Number of Pages: 288 | Format: Paperback | In other languages: (other languages) Spanish

Isbn-10: 0099470470 | Isbn-13: 9780099470472 | Publish date:  | Edition New Ed

Also available as: Hardcover , Audio Cassette , Others , Library Binding , Softcover and Stapled , eBook

Category: Non-fiction

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Book Description
The story of an obsessive young man and the girl he kidnaps and holds prisoner in his cellar.
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  • 5

    我覺得本書從很多角度來看都是非典型,主角不是典型的變態,女主角也不是典型的斯德哥爾摩症候群患者,結局也是有點非典型地....你看了就知道。

    "Forgetting is not something you do, it happens to you. - Fred"

    said on 

  • 4

    Molto bello! Uno dei primi romanzi (di un genere ora molto di successo) ad immergersi nella mente disturbata di uno psicopatico. La prima parte è raccontata, con assoluta mancanza di empatia, dal punto divista di Fred, un uomo solo che decide di ampliare la sua collezione di farfalle con la donna ...continue

    Molto bello! Uno dei primi romanzi (di un genere ora molto di successo) ad immergersi nella mente disturbata di uno psicopatico. La prima parte è raccontata, con assoluta mancanza di empatia, dal punto divista di Fred, un uomo solo che decide di ampliare la sua collezione di farfalle con la donna di cui è innamorato, Amanda. Nella seconda parte è lei, la vittima a parlare. I medesimi episodi sono raccontati da due punti di vista, due menti all'opposto. Fnale agghiacciante. Classico del genere.

    said on 

  • 5

    Best quotes

    The ordinary man is the curse of civilization.
    But he'so ordinary that he's extraordinary.

    I am one in a row of specimens. It's when I try to flutter out of line that he hates me. I'm meant to be dead, pinned, always the same, always beautiful. He knows that part of my beauty is being ...continue

    The ordinary man is the curse of civilization.
    But he'so ordinary that he's extraordinary.

    I am one in a row of specimens. It's when I try to flutter out of line that he hates me. I'm meant to be dead, pinned, always the same, always beautiful. He knows that part of my beauty is being alive, but it's the dead me he wants.

    It's him. And it's this weird male thing. Now I'm no longer nice. They sulk if you don't give, and hate you when you do. Intelligent men must despise themselves for being like that. Their illogicality. Sour men and wounded women.

    I could never cure him. Because I'm his disease.

    said on 

  • 4

    What intrigue me most is not the relationship between the kidnapper and the girl but the relationship between the girl and her "mentor" GP and what GP and some of the quotes she remember from him. Well that also because it reflected some of what's been happening in my real life

    said on 

  • 5

    符傲思--蝴蝶春夢

    It's one of the most startling and disturbing books I've ever read. My first encounter with Fowls happened when I tried to read "The Magus", but I failed to comprehend the complicated novel. "The Collector" is so well-known that I finally decided to give myself a second chance in approaching the ...continue

    It's one of the most startling and disturbing books I've ever read. My first encounter with Fowls happened when I tried to read "The Magus", but I failed to comprehend the complicated novel. "The Collector" is so well-known that I finally decided to give myself a second chance in approaching the legendary John Fowls.
    The novel is divided into three parts. Both the kidnapper and his beautiful victim have their monologues. Then the perpetrator has his final defense of his crime, which is the most terrifying climax. Created by Fowls, Frederick, or the Caliban, the paranoid psycho, has become the most bone-chilling, merciless yet deadly-attractive character one can ever meet in fictions.

    said on 

  • 4

    A rather disturbing psychological thriller.


    I didn't particularly care for the structure of the book. The first section is a first person narrative by Frederick Clegg, butterfly (and girl) collector. The second section is a set of diary entries by Miranda, collected girl and artist. The t ...continue

    A rather disturbing psychological thriller.

    I didn't particularly care for the structure of the book. The first section is a first person narrative by Frederick Clegg, butterfly (and girl) collector. The second section is a set of diary entries by Miranda, collected girl and artist. The third section returns to Clegg. I would have liked the novel better if I could have skipped over Miranda's section entirely. (But that might be because I despised Miranda.) Clegg is the fascinating character of the two, so I wish Fowles would have focused entirely on him.

    said on