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The Lost Fleet: Fearless

The Lost Fleet, Book 2

By Jack Campbell

(25)

| Mass Market Paperback | 9780441014767

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Book Description

Captain John "Black Jack" Geary tries a desperate gamble to lead the Alliance Fleet home - through enemy-occupied space - only to lose half the Fleet to an unexpected mutiny.

5 Reviews

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  • 1 person finds this helpful

    Starting to be not so interesting

    This second book shows some repetitions concerning the events already known from the 1st book, like the origin of the main characters and the way the star-ships move from here to there jumping of using the new technology of the hypernet gates.
    Howeve ...(continue)

    This second book shows some repetitions concerning the events already known from the 1st book, like the origin of the main characters and the way the star-ships move from here to there jumping of using the new technology of the hypernet gates.
    However, the way the fleet and the ships on it are supposed to work are explained to the reader which for some one without any knowledge of naval warfare is great.
    The book managed to get me into the 3rd one, nevertheless.

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    Ariano Olvido said on Nov 9, 2012 | Add your feedback

  • 1 person finds this helpful

    Star Spangled Adventure For Boys Of All Ages

    This series seems to be a typical example of the sub-genre called “military science fiction” or “military space opera.” I believe it is aimed at male teenagers but is the sort of mindlessly fun read that grown men could easily enjoy, too, if they hav ...(continue)

    This series seems to be a typical example of the sub-genre called “military science fiction” or “military space opera.” I believe it is aimed at male teenagers but is the sort of mindlessly fun read that grown men could easily enjoy, too, if they have an interest in military adventure or war stories. There is nothing sophisticated about the writing - this is pure adventure with a lot of “fan” service to military enthusiasts. I must say upfront that if the genre appeals to you then I recommend giving it a try if you are male and on the lookout for “brain-in-neutral” entertainment over a holiday weekend or plain old escapism. I do not recommend this to anyone looking for profound, insightful, or even very good writing. The number of times the hero, “Black Jack” Geary, suddenly realizes he has forgotten to breathe during a tense moment (of which there are very many) was a little monotonous.

    The characters are simplistic, morally black-and-white caricatures for the most part, but that is not too much of a bad thing if you are merely seeking mindless entertainment, or if you manage to enjoy the books of Dean R. Koontz, for example, the king of the one dimensional character who is either astoundingly good, considerate, moral, clever or, on the other hand, absolutely stupid, bad, and unredeemable. The Marines are depicted as Captains America, for example. Resolutely incorruptible, fiercely patriotic, and trained to a level of bravery and deadly capability that borders on superhero-dom.

    The romantic involvements are grindingly wooden, stilted affairs related at a level that would not corrupt an innocent teenager - understandable given its principal target audience, I suppose. But you read these books for military bravado, cunning, weaponry, and all-round kick-ass action, so one merely forgives and forgets, and carries on to the next tense installment of military action.

    The space battles are rather fun and there are many of them. Jack Campbell (pseudonym of ex-naval officer turned author, John G. Hemry) does an admirable job of making each space battle interesting and in some way unique - the military stratagems and brilliant tactics employed on and off the field of engagement to overcome usually overwhelming odds are what this series is truly about. This is where the story really shines, and even the political intrigue and machinations of various shady and corrupt politicians of the various star systems encountered is rather well done - as a rule the politicians mainly serve to provide another sort of enemy for “Black Jack” Geary, our squeaky clean and indomitable hero, to overcome in addition to space-faring enemy warships.

    One notable aspect is how Campbell emphasizes the importance of the speed of light in space battle. When ships are so far apart communication may take hours, even days, to reach its recipient. This also provides for interesting tatical opportunities. Jumping your fleet into a star system, for example, would allow you to immediately see and assess the situation as of, say, six hours ago, depending on your distance from the enemy planets and ships, which gives you six hours to assess the situation. The enemy planets and ships in the system, however, will not see you for another six hours because that is how long light from your ships will take to travel the vast distance to the enemy planets and ships and their sensors. Campbell does a very good job of exploiting these relativistic effects during the battle sequences.

    There is a back story developed rather nicely throughout the series that involves a mysterious alien race. Campbell manages to keep on introducing new intrigues to the back story and he keeps a rather long series of space engagements... well, engaging for the reader. His greatest achievement is keeping each of the many successive battles from becoming repetitive and boring. Each time there is something new to enjoy.

    There were some oddities and irritations I would like to mention just for interest’s sake. Campbell has all his characters use “there is” instead of the plural “there are.” For example, someone would report “there’s enemy ships” instead of “there’re enemy ships.” I found this consistently applied bad grammar irritating. Surely not *all* the many characters would consistently speak like this? Was Campbell trying to make a point? Is it supposed to make the language sound futuristic? I realize some people actually speak like this, but everybody!? Another oddity was the fact that all the citizens of the Alliance worlds (which spans many, many star systems) wholeheartedly believe in a form of ancestor worship. Characters would literally enter a small, holy room, and speak with their dead ancestors. Apparently the ancestors then gave them advice and guidance. They literally are described as feeling the presence of, say, a long dead brother, who then specifically gives them advice about something they are asked about. This seemingly complete uniformity in “speaking to the dead” seemed out of place in a hard-core military sci-fi adventure people by, presumably, down-to-earth, tough military types. Something about this non-essential “embellishment” did not ring true for me. Perhaps it is because I live in a country where various primitive forms of ancestor worship are rife. It seemed out of place in a depiction of sophisticated, far-future interstellar societies.

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    Ramnagel said on May 16, 2012 | Add your feedback

  • 1 person finds this helpful

    Sci-fi done right!

    In a world where almost all Sci-fi is monster related, it's nice to read something like this series.
    It focus on space and space battles with a critical eye and trying to be as realistic as you can be talking about ships traveling between star and s ...(continue)

    In a world where almost all Sci-fi is monster related, it's nice to read something like this series.
    It focus on space and space battles with a critical eye and trying to be as realistic as you can be talking about ships traveling between star and so on.
    Nice focus on the strategic point of view.
    I would have appreciated a bit more character development, but all in all it's a nice work.

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    Andhaka said on Feb 21, 2012 | Add your feedback

  • 1 person finds this helpful

    Good light read

    Enjoyable read. Dramatic but sometimes cliche. So don't look for high concept just fun adventure

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    Chris Stockdale said on Oct 26, 2011 | Add your feedback

  • 1 person finds this helpful

    la flotta dell'Alleanza combatte ancora

    secondo capitolo della saga di Lost Fleet, con Black Jack Geary sempre al comando della flotta dell'Alleanza. Il libro ha lo stesso schema del precedente: salto, bataglia; salto, battaglia... per cui alla lunga diventa ripetitivo, anche se in questo ...(continue)

    secondo capitolo della saga di Lost Fleet, con Black Jack Geary sempre al comando della flotta dell'Alleanza. Il libro ha lo stesso schema del precedente: salto, bataglia; salto, battaglia... per cui alla lunga diventa ripetitivo, anche se in questo capitolo le descrizioni dei movimenti della flotta sono più particolareggiate ed emozionanti. La storia d'amore che intercala le vicende militari dovrebbe aggiungere qualcosa, ma io ho un'idiosincrasia per le vicende romantiche inserite nelle storie d'azione e quindi non l'ho apprezzata più di tanto... de gustibus.
    Ci sono degli accenni ad un colpo di scena che dovrà svilupparsi nei prossimi libri che non sono rilevanti per la storia che si svolge in questo capitolo ma sono sufficienti per stimolare la lettura dei prossimi (oltre al fatto che non c'è una fine vera e propria).
    Nel complesso è inferiore al capitolo precedente e sembra più un romanzo di che prepara la storia per vicende che dovranno svolgersi nei prossimi episodi (si spera), ma resta comunque piacevole da leggere. Finirò sicuramente la saga.

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    Yattaman said on Feb 20, 2010 | Add your feedback

Book Details

  • Rating:
    (25)
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  • English Books
  • Mass Market Paperback 304 Pages
  • ISBN-10: 0441014763
  • ISBN-13: 9780441014767
  • Publisher: Ace
  • Publish date: 2007-01-30
  • Dimensions: 193 mm x 645 mm x 1,096 mm
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