Create your own shelf sign up

Together we find better books

[−]
  • Search Conteggio caratteri ISBN valido ISBN non valido Codice a barre valido Codice a barre non valido loading search

The Return of the Economic Naturalist

How Economics Helps Make Sense of Your World

By

Publisher: Virgin Books

3.0
(5)

Language:English | Number of Pages: 272 | Format: Mass Market Paperback

Isbn-10: 0753519666 | Isbn-13: 9780753519660 | Publish date: 

Also available as: eBook

Do you like The Return of the Economic Naturalist ?
Join aNobii to see if your friends read it, and discover similar books!

Sign up for free
Book Description
The Economic Naturalist is back with a whole batch of intriguing new questions and answers, drawn from his "New York Times" columns, that reveal how we really behave when confronted with economic choices. Do tax cuts for business owners really stimulate employment? Why shouldn't we just leave everything to the market? And why do we all save so little? Discover the answers to these and many more questions. With his trademark plain-speaking wit and insight, Robert Frank shows through dozens of examples how our personal choices about everything from paying for food and housing to large-scale policy decisions about taxation and the regulation of markets all boil down to the same simple economic principles, often resulting in the same wasteful mistakes. He shows that while our desires may be boundless, the resources necessary to satisfy them remain limited and argues that choices are always best made pragmatically - by carefully weighing the costs and benefits of competing options. This is a fascinating, entertaining and revealing collection full of insights that have more bearing than ever on our bank balances and our personal happiness.
Sorting by
  • 3

    Author's position is easy to guess after reading the first few articles: tax cut only encourages wealthy people to spend more money to out-do or crowd-out people, with the basic needs of the poor got deprived of. The same idea was vetted throughout the book and I found it too much.


    I like ...continue

    Author's position is easy to guess after reading the first few articles: tax cut only encourages wealthy people to spend more money to out-do or crowd-out people, with the basic needs of the poor got deprived of. The same idea was vetted throughout the book and I found it too much.

    I like his use of basic economic theories to explain common social phenomenon, especially the winner-take-all situation in financial sectors and schooling. To conclude, "Economic Naturalist", the same author's earlier book, is much more interesting.

    said on