Howards End

By

Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd

3.8
(1579)

Language: English | Number of Pages: 336 | Format: Paperback | In other languages: (other languages) German , Italian , French , Spanish , Japanese , Portuguese , Catalan , Dutch

Isbn-10: 014118213X | Isbn-13: 9780141182131 | Publish date: 

Also available as: Hardcover , Mass Market Paperback , School & Library Binding , Audio Cassette , Library Binding , Audio CD , Leather Bound , Others , eBook

Category: Family, Sex & Relationships , Fiction & Literature , Romance

Do you like Howards End ?
Join aNobii to see if your friends read it, and discover similar books!

Sign up for free
Book Description
A meticulously-observed drama of class warfare, E.M. Forster's "Howards End" explores the conflict inherent within English society, unveiling the character of a nation as never before. This "Penguin Classics" edition includes an introduction and notes by David Lodge. 'Only connect...' A chance acquaintance brings together the preposterous bourgeois Wilcox family and the clever, cultured and idealistic Schlegel sisters. As clear-eyed Margaret develops a friendship with Mrs Wilcox, the impetuous Helen brings into their midst a young bank clerk named Leonard Bast, who lives at the edge of poverty and ruin. When Mrs Wilcox dies, her family discovers that she wants to leave her country home, Howards End, to Margaret. Thus as Forster sets in motion a chain of events that will entangle three different families, he brilliantly portrays their aspirations to personal and social harmony. David Lodge's introduction provides an absorbing and eloquent overture to the 1910 novel that established Forster's reputation as an important writer, and that he himself later referred to as 'my best novel'.
This edition also contains a note on the text, suggestions for further reading, and explanatory notes. E. M. Forster (1879-1970) was a noted English author and critic and a member of the Bloomsbury group. His first novel, "Where Angels Fear To Tread" appeared in 1905. "The Longest Journey" appeared in 1907, followed by "A Room With A View" (1908), based partly on the material from extended holidays in Italy with his mother. "Howards End" (1910) was a story that centered on an English country house and dealt with the clash between two families, one interested in art and literature, the other only in business. "Maurice" was revised several times during his life, and finally published posthumously in 1971. If you enjoyed "Howard's End", you might like Forster's "A Room with a View", also available in "Penguin Classics".
Sorting by
  • 3

    Only connect !

    In the pages of Howards End, we read the stories of three families: the Anglo German Schlegel sisters, well educated and idealistic girls, The Wilcox an enriched and bourgeois, family dehumanized by ...continue

    In the pages of Howards End, we read the stories of three families: the Anglo German Schlegel sisters, well educated and idealistic girls, The Wilcox an enriched and bourgeois, family dehumanized by the economic power and the Bast family composed by Leonard Bast, a poor clerk with economic problems, married to a vulgar woman,
    Margaret and Helen Schlegel are perfectly conscious they can freely exercise their intellectual gifts thanks to their father's money, derived from his legacy.
    Their father had belonged to a type that was more prominent in Germany fifty years ago than now.
    The story is settled in at the beginning of the twenty century and London s the epicenter of the great cultural and social change of that period.
    He was not the aggressive German, so dear to the English journalist, nor the domestic German, so dear to the English wit. If one classed him at all it would be as the countryman of Hegel and Kant, as the idealist, inclined to be dreamy, whose Imperialism was the Imperialism of the air. Not that his life had been inactive. He had fought like blazes against Denmark, Austria, France. But he had fought without visualizing the results of victory. A hint of the truth broke on him after Sedan, when he saw the dyed moustaches of Napoleon going grey; another when he entered Paris, and saw the smashed windows of the Tuileries. Peace came—it was all very immense, one had turned into an Empire—but he knew that some quality had vanished for which not all Alsace-Lorraine could compensate him. Germany a commercial Power, Germany a naval Power, Germany with colonies here and a Forward Policy there, and legitimate aspirations in the other place, might appeal to others, and be fitly served by them; for his own part, he abstained from the fruits 30 of victory, and naturalized himself in England. The more earnest members of his family never forgave him, and knew that his children, though scarcely English of the dreadful sort, would never be German to the back-bone. He had obtained work in one of our provincial universities, and there married Poor Emily (or Die Englanderin, as the case may be), and as she had money, they proceeded to London, and came to know a good many people. But his gaze was always fixed beyond the sea. It was his hope that the clouds of materialism obscuring the Fatherland would part in time, and the mild intellectual light re-emerge.
    For this reason, they feel the moral duty to help the poor, and in particularly those who show an interest in the intellectual life, like Leonard Bast, with his romantic and intellectual dreams, is one of these people.
    In their intent to help Leonard, Margaret and Helen involve the Wilcox family too, but those ones ruin Leonard entirely.
    Helen loves the absolute. Leonard had been ruined absolutely, and had appeared to her as a man apart, isolated from the world. A real man, who cares for adventure and beauty, who desires to live decently and pay his way, who could have travelled more gloriously through life.
    What is his life? He had done wrong—that was the true terror.
    He desired to confess, and though the desire is proof of a weakened nature, which is about to lose the essence of human intercourse, it did not take an ignoble form. He did not suppose that confession would bring him happiness. It was rather that he yearned to get clear of the tangle. So does the suicide yearn. The impulses are akin, and the crime of suicide lies rather in its disregard for the feelings of those whom we leave behind.
    To Leonard, intent on his private sin, there come the conviction of innate goodness elsewhere. It is not the optimism which he has been taught at school.
    Death destroys a man, but the idea of death saves him—that is the best account of it that has yet been given. Squalor and tragedy can beckon to all that is great in us, and strengthen the wings of love.
    Life is a deep, deep river, death a blue sky, life is a house, death a wisp of hay, a flower, a tower, life and death are anything and everything, except that ordered insanity, where the king takes the queen, and the ace the king.
    The three family become in contact with each others, when Mrs Wilcox becomes Margaret Schlegel's friend and before dying she decides to give Margaret her beloved country cottage, Howard End.
    This house is not a simple building, but it is the symbol of a country of noble traditions: England, where the ideas of industrial and economic society have not destroyed the most important values of the humanity yet.
    At Howard End we assist to the conflict between different ways to understand life. Life becomes a conflict of classes and sex expressed in a different and intricate story of failed or missed marriages, of unsuccessful love stories and repressed violence.
    A story where every events, every characters reveal another meanings, a metaphoric and secret sense that takes everyone to realize the essence of the reality.
    Margaret never forgot any one for whom she had once cared; she connected, though the connection might be bitter, and she hoped that some day her husband Henry would do the same.
    Only connect!. It is the final taught.
    Only connect the prose and the passion and both will be exalted, and human love will be seen at its height. Live in fragments no longer.

    said on 

  • 3

    Non mi ha convinta

    Dal momento che si parla di Howards End come del capolavoro di Forster, mi aspettavo che il romanzo mi piacesse quanto o di più di Camera con vista o Maurice che avevo amato. In realtà, l'ho apprezzat ...continue

    Dal momento che si parla di Howards End come del capolavoro di Forster, mi aspettavo che il romanzo mi piacesse quanto o di più di Camera con vista o Maurice che avevo amato. In realtà, l'ho apprezzato molto di meno, in primo luogo perché a mio parere viene meno a quello che era il suo principale obiettivo (dichiarato nel sottotitolo), vale a dire il "connettere". Forster voleva collegare fra loro le vite di tre ceti sociali differenti: i ricchi arroganti Wilcox impegnati nel colonialismo britannico, le sorelle Shlegel anticonformiste e amanti delle arti, e i proletari Bast che vivono nei sobborghi di Londra. Tuttavia, non capisco proprio in che modo la "connessione" si possa essere verificata nel corso della storia, anche perché ai poveri Bast è lasciato ben poco spazio nel romanzo, divenendo vittime dei più influenti coprotagonisti. Che forse Forster volesse alludere al fatto che i ceti inferiori sono succubi e senza libertà di scelta se posti di fronte alle classi più agiate? Forse. Ma come si spiega poi la passione della raffinata Margaret Shlegel per un uomo privo di fantasia o sensibilità come Mr. Wilcox? Tutto sommato lo considero un buon romanzo, ma di certo non un capolavoro come viene spesso descritto, e in effetti preferisco il Forster passionale di Camera con vista a quello verboso e inconsistente di Howards End.

    said on 

  • 5

    Realtà differenti e lontane, contrapposte, essere ed apparire, culture diverse, città e campagna londinese, borghesia e proletariato, tradizione e progresso, sono i temi che compongono la storia del r ...continue

    Realtà differenti e lontane, contrapposte, essere ed apparire, culture diverse, città e campagna londinese, borghesia e proletariato, tradizione e progresso, sono i temi che compongono la storia del romanzo. Un popolo che per convivere deve trovare una qualche connessione, punto di contatto, per poter unire persone e classi sociali diverse, in un’Inghilterra che si avvia verso una nuova fase storica e sociale, Forster dice che il nuovo, coloro che si occupano di “fare”, deve essere coniugato alla tradizione per attecchire e sedimentare, la cultura non può sottrarsi e snobbare la logica economica di chi “fa le cose” e che produce il progresso di un paese. Insomma la cultura non deve essere astratta e il fare non deve essere arido.

    said on 

  • *** This comment contains spoilers! ***

    3

    solo connettere

    si può essere legati ad un posto prima ancora di vederlo? si può trovare il senso di se stessi in una casa umida al confine tra la londra che avanza e la campagna? la risposta è sempre si. l'amore per ...continue

    si può essere legati ad un posto prima ancora di vederlo? si può trovare il senso di se stessi in una casa umida al confine tra la londra che avanza e la campagna? la risposta è sempre si. l'amore per la natura, per quella natura spontanea, non irregimentata dall'uomo, la natura che rispetta, che ama, che accoglie, è tutto qui, ed esplode sempre più, andando avanti nella lettura di questo romanzo pieno di emozioni. la sensazione che deriva, alla fine della lettura, è che tutto fosse connesso, con l'amore come legante. I sentimenti veri e puri tra le due sorelle, l'amore per la giustizia, l'onestà, e la bellezza della natura. Mi sono solo chiesta, alla fine, se fosse nello spirito del libro essersi dimenticati così della povera signora Bast, caduta nell'oblio, senza più il marito, senza soldi, senza casa.

    said on 

  • 4

    Il destino di Edward Forster è stato abbastanza strano: non ha avuto un grandissimo successo di pubblico, ma dai suoi libri sono stati tratti bellissimi film. Io sono stata tra gli entusiasti lettori ...continue

    Il destino di Edward Forster è stato abbastanza strano: non ha avuto un grandissimo successo di pubblico, ma dai suoi libri sono stati tratti bellissimi film. Io sono stata tra gli entusiasti lettori di questo romanzo, prima di vederne la versione cinematografica

    said on 

  • *** This comment contains spoilers! ***

    2

    Margaret ed Helen Schlegel sono due sorelle londinesi di origine tedesca che fanno parte di quel ceto superiore che vive sulle proprie rassicuranti "isole di denaro", ben al di sopra di un'umanità pov ...continue

    Margaret ed Helen Schlegel sono due sorelle londinesi di origine tedesca che fanno parte di quel ceto superiore che vive sulle proprie rassicuranti "isole di denaro", ben al di sopra di un'umanità povera e spesso derelitta la cui preoccupazione principale è la sopravvivenza.
    Le Schlegel sono ben consapevoli della propria fortuna, e del fatto che grazie ad essa possano occuparsi delle problematiche e dell'approfondimento della conoscenza della vita interiore. Alle due si contrappongono i Wilcox, numerosi membri di una famiglia benestante, ma dalla mentalità ottusa e dall'indole ipocrita.
    L'incontro tra le due famiglie, tra due facce così diverse della stessa medaglia, cambierà inesorabilmente la vita di Helen e Margaret: la prima, vivacissima e solare, sarà per sempre colpita dal panico e dal vuoto che vede una mattina negli occhi di uno dei Wilcox, la seconda, meno attraente e più riflessiva, vi troverà invece l'amore, e con esso i compromessi per raggiungere la felicità.
    Helen rappresenta quindi la frattura insanabile, il rifiuto verso qualcosa di inaccettabile e non condivisibile, e a lei è sovrapponibile quella Londra delle grandi case patronali che non può far altro che soccombere all'avanzata del progresso ed ai palazzoni condominiali che prendono il posto delle case unifamiliari; Margaret è invece l'accettazione fiduciosa del cambiamento -pur se non sempre positivo-, che comunque non le fa perdere mai davvero se stessa, come la capitale britannica, che, se dal un lato si piega al grigiore e a quelle che possono essere le brutture portate dal progresso, non perde mai davvero la sua anima.
    Aleggia su tutti il personaggio della signora Wilcox, che forse si tende a sottovalutare, ma che in realtà riesce, sola, a comprendere cosa alberghi nel cuore di coloro che la circondano, e che sceglie -e la vita, con i suoi strani ed imprevedibili rivolgimenti le darà ragione-, come erede della sua amata casa Howard, l'unica persona che saprà amarla altrettanto e riporre in essa la propria anima.

    http://iltesorodicarta.blogspot.it/

    said on 

  • 5

    Se non è arte questa...

    Immanente e senza tempo, sublime e subliminale.
    Forster riesce non solo a descrivere i flussi di coscienza dei suoi personaggi dall'esterno, ma anche le connessioni che si creano quando questi attrave ...continue

    Immanente e senza tempo, sublime e subliminale.
    Forster riesce non solo a descrivere i flussi di coscienza dei suoi personaggi dall'esterno, ma anche le connessioni che si creano quando questi attraversano altre persone, luoghi o cose. Se non è arte questa...

    said on 

  • 2

    dal blog Giramenti

    Chi mi conosce non si stupirà di sapere che a pagina 67 ho urlato “Basta!”, ho anche aggiunto eccheccazzo ma non sta bene dirlo qui.
    Anzi, chi mi conosce sarà piuttosto stupito di sapere che ho tentat ...continue

    Chi mi conosce non si stupirà di sapere che a pagina 67 ho urlato “Basta!”, ho anche aggiunto eccheccazzo ma non sta bene dirlo qui.
    Anzi, chi mi conosce sarà piuttosto stupito di sapere che ho tentato di leggere Casa Howard, io che mi sono sempre rifiutata di vedere il film. Nonostante la pellicola sia piena di grandi nomi, nomi che gradisco moltissimo, attori che sicuramente mi avrebbero messa prudentemente in guardia: questo film non fa per te… figuriamoci il libro.

    SEGUE su http://gaialodovica.wordpress.com/2014/01/29/casa-howard-di-edward-morgan-forster/

    said on 

Sorting by
Sorting by