Demasiada felicidad
by Alice Munro
(*)(*)(*)(*)( )(933)
Una joven madre recibe consuelo inesperado por la muerte de sus tres hijos, otra reacciona de forma insólita ante la
humillación a la que la somete un hombre; otros cuentos describen la crueldad de los niños y los huecos de soledad que se crean en el día a día de la vida de pareja. Y el último cuento trata de Sophia Kovalevsky, una matemática rusa que vivió a finales del siglo XIX, en su largo peregrinaje en busca de una universidad que admitiera a mujeres como profesoras.
Anécdotas en apariencia banales se transforman en las manos de Munro en emociones, y su estilo transporta estas emociones sin dificultad, gracias a un talento excepcional que arrastra al lector dentro de las historias casi sin preámbulos.

All Reviews

13 + 205 in other languages
Marta RaczkaxMarta Raczkax wrote a review
00
BIBLIOPADILLABIBLIOPADILLA wrote a review
00
(*)(*)(*)(*)(*)
BIBLIOPADILLABIBLIOPADILLA wrote a review
00
(*)(*)(*)(*)(*)
Ally YangAlly Yang wrote a review
00
(*)(*)(*)(*)(*)
p.58 It almost seems as if there must be some random and of course unfair thrift in the emotional housekeeping of the world, if the great happiness-however temporary, however flimsy-of one person could come out of the great unhappiness of another.

p.141 In all my years in town, I encountered on one who was divorced, and so it may be taken for granted that there were other couples living separate lives in one house, other men and women who had accepted the fact that there were differences never to be mended, a word or and act never to be forgiven, a barrier never to be washed away.

p.175 He liked her not knowing. Her ignorance woke a pleasure that melted on his tongue, like a lick of toffee.

p.241 He never raises his head to judge how far he still has to go. If he pretends the incline goes on forever, it'll be a kind of bonus, a surprise to get to the top.

p.283 Life can be perfectly satisfying without major achievements.

p.293

One's appreciation of meager comforts, it seems, depends on what misery one has gone through before getting them.

How terrible it is, Sophia thinks. How terrible is the lot of women. And What might this woman say if Sophia told her about the new struggles, women's battle for votes and places at the universities? She might say, But that is not as God wills. And if Sophia urged her to get rid of the God and sharpen her mind, would she not look at her -Sophia-with a certain stubborn pity, and exhaustion, and say, How then, without God, are we to get through this life?
Angela84Angela84 wrote a review
00
(*)(*)(*)(*)(*)
Aryel RaskólnikovAryel Raskólnikov wrote a review
00
(*)(*)(*)(*)( )
RigoloRigolo wrote a review
00
(*)(*)(*)( )( )