Invisible Women
by Caroline Criado Perez
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Imagine a world where your phone is too big for your hand, where your doctor prescribes a drug that is wrong for your body, where in a car accident you are 47% more likely to be seriously injured, where every week the countless hours of work you do are not recognised or valued.

If any of this sounds familiar, chances are that you're a woman.

Invisible Women shows us how, in a world largely built for and by men, we are systematically ignoring half the population. It exposes the gender data gap – a gap in our knowledge that is at the root of perpetual, systemic discrimination against women, and that has created a pervasive but invisible bias with a profound effect on women’s lives.

From government policy and medical research, to technology, workplaces, urban planning and the media, Invisible Women reveals the biased data that excludes women.

Award-winning campaigner and writer Caroline Criado Perez brings together for the first time an impressive range of case studies, stories and new research from across the world that illustrate the hidden ways in which women are forgotten, and the impact this has on their health and well-being. In making the case for change, this powerful and provocative book will make you see the world anew.

alissa's Review

alissaalissa wrote a review
12
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An insight into data bias
A gigantic number of missing data across many areas of our lives are carefully analysed. Criado Perez presents many examples of a blatant male bias in the aggregate data being used to make decisions that affect women and men and leaves it sitting there for all to see. The good news is that hopefully men won't find it too menacing and that they might, therefore, consider reading it. There is no man-bashing here. On the contrary. The author states that this gender bias is not malicious, that it is and always has been unintentional, but it does disadvantage women. Overall, it underlines the dangerous effects of treating males - often 20-something 70-kilo white American males - as the default human being. This is a very well written book which carefully exposes an extraordinary volume of missing data across every area of our lives. As a woman, wife, mother, and feminist, the book definitely resonates. "(...) Male universality is also a cause of the gender data gap: because women aren't seen and aren't remembered, because male data makes up the majority of what we know, what is male comes to be seen as universal. It leads to the positioning of women, half the global population, as a minority. With a niche identity and subjective point of view. In such a framing, women are set up to be forgettable. Ignorable. Dispensable - from culture, from history, a from data. And so, women become invisible.”
alissaalissa wrote a review
12
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Comments

0
As a white male I confirm that I didn'd feel menaced by the extraordinary research and quantity of (missing) data. Reading the book has provided me with so many topics to use against my own unknown biases!
0
As a white male I confirm that I didn'd feel menaced by the extraordinary research and quantity of (missing) data. Reading the book has provided me with so many topics to use against my own unknown biases!