La doble esposa
by Alafair Burke
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Cuando Angela conoció a Jason Powell mientras preparaba un catering en los East Hampton, asumió que su romance duraría poco, duraría lo que duran los amores de verano. Pero para su sorpresa, Jason, un brillante profesor de economía en la NYU, tenía otros planes, y se casaron el siguiente verano. Para Angela, el matrimonio resultó ser una oportunidad para rehacer su vida. Ella y su hijo pueden finalmente mudarse de casa de su madre a Manhattan, donde nadie conoce su trágico pasado.

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Historia63Historia63 wrote a review
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In an eerily prescient novel, Alafair Burke has given us a psychological thriller that feels more than ripped from the headlines, one that kept this reader rapidly turning pages to see what will happen next.

From the publisher: When Angela met Jason Powell while catering a dinner party in East Hampton, she assumed their romance would be a short-lived thing, like so many relationships between locals and summer visitors. To her surprise, Jason, a brilliant economics professor at NYU, had other plans, and they married the following summer. For Angela, the marriage turned out to be a chance to reboot her life. She and her son were finally able to move out of her mother’s home, to Manhattan, where no one knew about her tragic past. Six years later, thanks to a bestselling book and a growing media career, Jason has become a cultural lightning rod, placing Angela near the spotlight she worked so carefully to avoid. When a college intern makes an accusation against Jason, and another woman, Kerry Lynch, comes forward with an even more troubling allegation, their perfect life begins to unravel. Jason insists he is innocent, and Angela believes him. But when Kerry disappears, Angela is forced to take a closer look at the man she married. And when she is asked to defend Jason in court, she realizes that her loyalty to her husband could unearth old secrets.

The novel opens with these provocative words: “In an instant, I became the woman they assumed I’d been all along: the wife who lied to protect her husband.” And a woman who is told “You’re more than a bystander. . . Don’t let Jason take you and your boy down with him.” Angela had met Jason at 24, when she was a mother to a six-year-old boy, Spencer, whose legal adoption by Jason turns out to be more difficult than anticipated. But difficulties and complications are just beginning. It is impossible to read this book without flashing back to the headlines of the recent past.

The author, a former prosecutor who now teaches criminal law, has given the reader a page-turner of a book, one which is highly recommended.