Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes
Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes
Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes
Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes

Leviathan

by Thomas Hobbes
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Description
Hobbes attempts an analysis of society from first principles, beginning with Man and the Senses. He develops this in a sequence of definitions (for example: Imagination is "nothing but decaying sense" and is the same as Memory). He points out the Necessity of Definitions, which is a hint that he is attempting an axiomatisation of political philosophy in line with the programme of geometry. He defines various passions in an unsentimental way: e.g. "But whatsoever is the object of any man's appetite or desire, that is it which he for his part calleth good; and the object of his hate and aversion, evil; and of his contempt, vile and inconsiderable. For these words of good, evil, and contemptible are ever used with relation to the person that useth them: there being nothing simply and absolutely so; nor any common rule of good and evil to be taken from the nature of the objects themselves...".
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About this Edition

Language

English

Publisher

Publication Date

Jun 18, 2012

Format

eBook

ISBN

9781105869211

ISBN-13

9781105869211