ReWork
by David Heinemeier Hansson, Jason Fried
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From the founders of the trailblazing software company 37signals, here is a different kind of business book - one that explores a new reality. Today, anyone can be in business. Tools that used to be out of reach are now easily accessible. Technology that cost thousands is now just a few pounds or ev... More

Maciej Nowicki's Review

Maciej NowickiMaciej Nowicki wrote a review
00
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Spoiler Alert
Book review
For many, starting a new business can be relatively overwhelming. I assume that, if you read my posts, you hear many gripping stories about successful entrepreneurs who reached their first million-dollar profit almost overnight. On one hand, going the same path sounds tempting, but on the other hand, it might be a bit intimidating.

Rework, written by Jason Fried, says that such attitude is complete rubbish. Such stories delude people. It says that if you want to start a firm, you shouldn’t focus on a mass-scale business, but rather something smaller, especially at the beginning. It should be something that you like and understand. Something that does respond to specific customer needs and gives you a steady stream of income. It might give you a great sense of accomplishment and experience to grow. “Enjoy the path not just the reward”.

Anyway, the book is well structured and very short. It contains a set of principles you should follow during your entrepreneurial journey. It starts with a typical call to action which goes like – stop planning and complaining, just do it. Then, the book focuses on progress, productivity, marketing and some HR aspects, such as hiring process and organisational culture. All chapters are very brief, practical and easy to comprehend.

When it comes to my opinion about the book, I have to admit that I’m a bit puzzled. On one hand, I really appreciate its compact form and focus on practicality. On the other hand, some ideas were too radical or expressed in a very shallow way to convince me effectively.

Nevertheless, I’d like to mention some ideas.
Planning – planning is guessing. Nowadays, focusing on making estimation is a huge abuse. Everybody these days has to be excellent because the cult of excellence has been driven into our society. It is expensive... (if you like to read my full review please visit my blog: leadersarereaders.blog/rework)
Maciej NowickiMaciej Nowicki wrote a review
00
(*)(*)(*)(*)(*)
Spoiler Alert
Book review
For many, starting a new business can be relatively overwhelming. I assume that, if you read my posts, you hear many gripping stories about successful entrepreneurs who reached their first million-dollar profit almost overnight. On one hand, going the same path sounds tempting, but on the other hand, it might be a bit intimidating.

Rework, written by Jason Fried, says that such attitude is complete rubbish. Such stories delude people. It says that if you want to start a firm, you shouldn’t focus on a mass-scale business, but rather something smaller, especially at the beginning. It should be something that you like and understand. Something that does respond to specific customer needs and gives you a steady stream of income. It might give you a great sense of accomplishment and experience to grow. “Enjoy the path not just the reward”.

Anyway, the book is well structured and very short. It contains a set of principles you should follow during your entrepreneurial journey. It starts with a typical call to action which goes like – stop planning and complaining, just do it. Then, the book focuses on progress, productivity, marketing and some HR aspects, such as hiring process and organisational culture. All chapters are very brief, practical and easy to comprehend.

When it comes to my opinion about the book, I have to admit that I’m a bit puzzled. On one hand, I really appreciate its compact form and focus on practicality. On the other hand, some ideas were too radical or expressed in a very shallow way to convince me effectively.

Nevertheless, I’d like to mention some ideas.
Planning – planning is guessing. Nowadays, focusing on making estimation is a huge abuse. Everybody these days has to be excellent because the cult of excellence has been driven into our society. It is expensive... (if you like to read my full review please visit my blog:
leadersarereaders.blog/rework)